On November 2, USIP hosted a conversation on the role of women in creating an inclusive and equitable path forward for the peacebuilding field. The discussion brought together women practitioners and academics from a range of generational and geographical backgrounds to examine what their diverse experiences with equity and inclusion can tell us about the state of peacebuilding — as well as what can be done to better elevate women’s voices in the future.

Speakers

Joseph Sanywelcoming remarks
Vice President, Africa Center, U.S. Institute of Peace
@Josephsany1

Liz Hume, keynote remarks  
Executive Director, Alliance for Peacebuilding
@lizhume4peace

Dorothy Nyambi 
Chief Executive Officer and President, Mennonite Economic Development Associates  
@drdnyambi

Esra Çuhadar 
Senior Expert, Dialogue and Peace Processes, U.S. Institute of Peace
@ceragesra

Shannon Paige 
Policy Associate, Peace Direct

Maria Antonia Montes, moderator 
Program Officer, Latin America, U.S. Institute of Peace
@tonis_montes

Kathleen Kuehnast, closing remarks  
Director, Gender Policy and Strategy, U.S. Institute of Peace
@kathkuehnast

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