Afghanistan has entered a pivotal but uncertain time. A peace process to end the 18-year war has gathered steam, with talks between the U.S. and Taliban appearing to make substantial progress on foreign troop presence and counterterrorism. Negotiations among Afghans on the country’s political future have not begun, however, and last week’s conference in Doha that might have launched these discussions collapsed at the last minute. Diplomatic contacts continue, but the security situation throughout the country is dire as the Taliban gear up for what is likely to be another bloody fighting season. 

During this moment of rapid developments, rare opportunity, and considerable uncertainty, the U.S. Institute of Peace hosted a distinguished panel of experts examine what’s next for the Afghan peace process.

Follow the conversation with #Afghanpeace.

Speakers

Scott Worden, welcoming remarks
Director, Afghanistan and Central Asia Program, U.S. Institute of Peace

Belquis Ahmadi
Senior Program Officer, U.S. Institute of Peace

Jarrett Blanc
Senior Fellow, Geoeconomics and Strategy Program, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace

Lotfullah Najafizada
Director, TOLOnews TV

Scott Smith
Technical Advisor, Afghanistan, U.S Institute of Peace 

Johnny Walsh, moderator
Senior Expert, Afghanistan, U.S. Institute of Peace

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