The Latest @ USIP: Grassroots Efforts to Address Sudan’s Humanitarian Crisis

The Latest @ USIP: Grassroots Efforts to Address Sudan’s Humanitarian Crisis

Tuesday, February 13, 2024

By: Sara Pantuliano

More than half of Sudan’s population of 46 million is in need of humanitarian assistance -- and less than a quarter of them are actually receiving aid amid the country’s civil conflict. Sara Pantuliano, the chief executive for the Overseas Development Institute, discusses the current crisis in Sudan, why Sudan is important for global peace and how grassroots organizations in the country can help deliver aid to places that international organizations cannot reach.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

USIP Explains: How Religious Freedom Promotes Peace and Security

USIP Explains: How Religious Freedom Promotes Peace and Security

Monday, January 29, 2024

By: Knox Thames

In almost every society, religious belief can guide the actions of people in both positive and negative ways. For peacebuilders, it’s important to understand the religious landscape in communities affected by conflicts and violence. USIP’s Knox Thames discusses how promoting openness to freedom of thought, conscience, religion and belief can help de-escalate violence and lead to better stability and security.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & PreventionReligion

The Latest @ USIP: U.S.-Australia Cooperation in the Pacific Islands

The Latest @ USIP: U.S.-Australia Cooperation in the Pacific Islands

Monday, January 8, 2024

By: Pat Conroy

Spanning a vast part of the globe, the Pacific Islands are neighbors to both the United States and Australia — which makes their security and prosperity deeply intertwined with our own. Pat Conroy, Australia’s minister for international development and the Pacific, discusses how the United States and Australia can work together to deliver on our commitments to address the region’s most pressing challenges such as climate change, economic growth and stability.

Type: Blog

Global Policy

The Latest @ USIP: How to Address Sudan’s Humanitarian Crisis Amid War

The Latest @ USIP: How to Address Sudan’s Humanitarian Crisis Amid War

Wednesday, January 3, 2024

By: Patrick Youssef

Nearly nine months into Sudan’s civil conflict, the fighting has not only upended daily life across the country, but also disrupted Sudan’s already shaky economic and social services — leaving millions in need of dire humanitarian assistance. Patrick Youssef, regional director for Africa at the International Committee of the Red Cross, discusses how the conflict is affecting Sudan’s civilian population and why some sort of agreement between the warring sides is the only way to safely clear avenues for humanitarian intervention.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

The Latest @ USIP: U.N. Engagement in Afghanistan

The Latest @ USIP: U.N. Engagement in Afghanistan

Wednesday, December 20, 2023

By: Kanni Wignaraja

While some parts of the Afghan economy managed to stabilize in 2023, poverty continued to increase and now stands at 69 percent of the population. Kanni Wignaraja, director for Asia and the Pacific at the U.N. Development Programme, discusses UNDP’s efforts to build resilience in local markets and promote women-owned enterprises in Afghanistan; explores ways to navigate relations with the Taliban; and examines how the decline in international aid is affecting humanitarian efforts in the country.

Type: Blog

EconomicsHuman Rights

Ask the Experts: The Genocide Convention 75 Years On

Ask the Experts: The Genocide Convention 75 Years On

Thursday, December 14, 2023

By: Andrew Cheatham;  Ambassador David Scheffer

Since the Genocide Convention was introduced 75 years ago, the crime of genocide has become so well known and so well understood that the international backlash is nearly instantaneous — and holding perpetrators accountable for this crime is foundational to many international judicial systems, from the tribunals for the former Yugoslavia and Rwanda in the 1990s to the prosecution of the Khmer Rouge in Cambodia. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with David Scheffer, the former U.S. ambassador at-large for war crimes issues and professor at Arizona State University, about the history of the Genocide Convention and the mechanisms by which genocide and other atrocity crimes are prosecuted.

Type: Blog

Human Rights

RISE Action Guide: Addressing the Collective Trauma of Violent Extremism

RISE Action Guide: Addressing the Collective Trauma of Violent Extremism

Wednesday, December 6, 2023

By: Chris Bosley;  Heidi Ellis;  Sarhang Hamasaeed;  Brandon Kohrt

The territorial defeat of ISIS gave way to another challenge, one that is common with violent extremist groups around the world: How to handle the tens of thousands who lived under — and engaged with — the Islamic State. With just under 50,000 people from over 60 countries still consigned to displacement camps and detention centers in the region, the lack of a long-term solution offers ISIS a possible recruiting source to reconstitute their ranks. USIP’s Rehabilitation and (Re)integration through Individual, Social, and Structural Engagement (RISE) Action Guide offers an approach to develop viable exit ramps for those who have engaged in violent extremism to return to society — as well as support for the communities affected by it.

Type: Blog

Violent Extremism

Missing Peace Initiative: Listen to Survivors to Prevent Sexual Violence in War

Missing Peace Initiative: Listen to Survivors to Prevent Sexual Violence in War

Wednesday, November 29, 2023

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.;  Margot Wallström;  Sofiia Kornieieva;  Kolbassia Haoussou;  Sayda Eisa Ismail;  Mause-Darline Francois

For over a decade, the Missing Peace Initiative has brought together scholars, policymakers, practitioners and survivors of conflict-related sexual violence to discuss new ways to prevent this scourge of war. At the initiative’s second global symposium, USIP spoke with several experts on the progress made in the last 10 years, the importance of hearing directly from survivors and persons with disabilities, and the continued work that needs to be done to end this horrific crime.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGender

USIP’s ‘First in War, First in Peace’ Series

USIP’s ‘First in War, First in Peace’ Series

Monday, November 20, 2023

By: Patrick Spero;  Michael Yaffe, Ph.D.

The U.S. Institute of Peace’s new series, “First in War, First in Peace,” looks to engage with veterans who experienced the horrors of conflict firsthand and have now dedicated themselves to building nonviolent paths toward peace. Patrick Spero, executive director of the George Washington Presidential Library at Mount Vernon, and USIP’s Michael Yaffe discuss why the legacy of our nation’s first president was the right topic for the series’ inaugural event, what they hope the series can accomplish going forward, and the need to connect with various veterans’ groups and organizations around the country.

Type: Blog

Peace Processes

The Latest @ USIP: What’s Needed to Ease China-India Border Tensions?

The Latest @ USIP: What’s Needed to Ease China-India Border Tensions?

Tuesday, November 14, 2023

By: Sushant Singh

Tensions along China and India’s remote Himalayan border continue to rise, with more than 50,000 soldiers stationed in the region on either side. The situation has begun bleeding into other facets of China-India relations, as diplomacy and economic cooperation have decreased in recent years. Sushant Singh, a senior fellow at the Centre for Policy Research in India, discusses the short-term options for easing the border dispute, India’s broader aims regarding its relationship with China, and how the U.S. and India should lean on their shared democratic values as they seek to counter China’s aggressive rise on the world stage.

Type: Blog

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGlobal Policy