The U.S. Institute of Peace’s new series, “First in War, First in Peace,” looks to engage with veterans who experienced the horrors of conflict firsthand and have now dedicated themselves to building nonviolent paths toward peace. Patrick Spero, executive director of the George Washington Presidential Library at Mount Vernon, and USIP’s Michael Yaffe discuss why the legacy of our nation’s first president was the right topic for the series’ inaugural event, what they hope the series can accomplish going forward, and the need to connect with various veterans’ groups and organizations around the country.

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