African countries are grappling with a wide range of cross-national security threats, from illicit trafficking to extremist groups such as Boko Haram and al-Shabab. At the same time, China and Russia have expanded their involvement in Africa while U.S. engagement has waned in recent years. Retired Admiral James Foggo, who served as commander of U.S. Naval Forces Europe-Africa, discusses his experience working with African security partners, explores ways the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit can bring the continent back to the forefront of U.S. foreign policy, and explains how expanded NATO-African Union cooperation opens doors for engagement with all 54 African countries at once.

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