In his address at the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit, President Biden declared that the United States was “all in” when it came to Africa’s peace, security and development. The summit itself did feature a number of ambitious initiatives for expanding U.S. engagement on the continent — but the United States now must follow through on its implementation, and the question of what “all in” will look like in practice looms large for African leaders. USIP’s Andrew Cheatham spoke with Ambassador Johnnie Carson — the newly named special presidential representative for U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit implementation — to discuss the Biden administration’s post-summit goals, what African leaders hope to take away from the talks, and why this moment offers a unique chance to reframe the U.S. approach toward Africa.

Related Publications

Ukraine: A Real Peace Will Require Change from Russia

Ukraine: A Real Peace Will Require Change from Russia

Thursday, January 26, 2023

By: Mary Glantz, Ph.D.

The United States and its allies are seeking ways to promote a sustainable peace in Europe — one that ends Russia’s brutal assault on Ukraine and strengthens a global prohibition on such wars of aggrandizement. Tragically but realistically, Russia, like most historic imperial powers, will need to be defeated militarily before it abandons war as a means to dominate its neighbors. Any negotiated peace before such a defeat will simply let Russia rebuild its forces and renew its assault. Yet even as the West should maintain full support for Ukraine’s defense, such as the tanks much discussed this month, it should encourage negotiation toward specific goals.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

The Latest: Three Things to Know About the U.S.-Africa Partnership

The Latest: Three Things to Know About the U.S.-Africa Partnership

Thursday, January 26, 2023

By: Joseph Sany, Ph.D.

Following the U.S.-Africa Leaders Summit (USALS) in December 2022, African leaders are preparing to gather for the African Union’s own summit in February. The USALS saw $55 billion in U.S. commitments to Africa for everything from security to democracy promotion on the continent. As African leaders gather next month to discuss the critical issues facing the continent, it’s important to consider the steps needed to put these commitments into action. USIP’s Joseph Sany explains what was accomplished at the USALS, what steps will be needed to further the summit’s objectives and the critical issues to be discussed at the forthcoming African Union Summit.

Type: Blog

Global Policy

Whither Iran on the Revolution’s Anniversary?

Whither Iran on the Revolution’s Anniversary?

Tuesday, January 24, 2023

By: Robin Wright

Iran marks the anniversary of the Islamic revolution in February amid increasingly existential challenges at home and in relations with the outside world. Four months of nationwide protests — triggered by the death of 22-year-old Mahsa Amini in September 2022 — reflected deepening discontent among Iran’s Gen Z. Young women on streets and at schools abandoned the headscarves required by law, as shouts of “woman, life, freedom” and “death to the dictator” echoed across campus grounds. The protests were a brazen rejection of Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei and, more broadly, the theocracy’s basic belief that god’s law supersedes human laws. The scope of fury was reflected on October 8, when female students at Al Zahra University in Tehran shouted “Clerics, get lost” during a visit by President Ebrahim Raisi.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

North Korean Arms Control Doesn’t Have to Conflict with Disarmament

North Korean Arms Control Doesn’t Have to Conflict with Disarmament

Thursday, January 19, 2023

By: John Carl Baker

There is a tension between limiting North Korea’s nuclear weapons program and pursuing the goal of a denuclearized Korean peninsula. To emphasize the former — through arms control and risk-reduction measures — can seem at times like a repudiation of the latter. Conversely, a focus on disarmament — still the core of U.S. policy — can seem outright fanciful given North Korea’s stunning technological advances. In North Korea, the United States faces a nuclear-armed state whose capabilities continue to expand despite international opposition and extensive economic sanctions. Disarmament simply isn’t in the cards right now.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & PreventionGlobal Policy

View All Publications