This micro-course defines negotiation and describes the two main components of any negotiation process. It also presents five different conflict styles that can be expressed in a negotiation and explains how these different styles can be applied given the context in which a negotiation is taking place.

Colombian women mediators taking part in a dialogue in Colombia. Photo by USIP
Colombian women mediators taking part in a dialogue in Colombia. Photo by USIP

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the two main components of any negotiation process;
  • Identify different conflict styles; and
  • Explain how different conflict styles may arise in a negotiation.

 

Overview Video

Click play to watch the overview video.

Agenda

Section 1- Introduction

Meet the course presenters and get a broad overview of what negotiation is and why it is important.

Section 2 - Definitions and Historical Context

Defines a negotiation and the various ways in which one can engage in it.

Section 3 - Stories from the Field

Explains how the various components of a negotiation process manifest themselves in different contexts.

Section 4 - Theory and Practice

Discusses how personality types and conflict styles impact the success or failure of negotiations.

Section 5 - Quiz

Assesses your understanding and retention of key terms, concepts, and ideas presented in this course.

Section 6 - Scenario

Allows you to apply the knowledge you've gained throughout the course to a fictional conflict scenario.

Section 7 - Reflections

Allows you to share what you have learned and read what others have learned from this course and how these skills and knowledge will impact the work we do.

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructor

Guest Experts

  • Alison Milofsky, Director, United States Institute of Peace
  • Jacqueline Wilson, Principal, Civic Fusion
  • Daryn Cambridge, Professional Development Portfolio Manager (EPIC) | Training Resources Group, Inc

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