This micro-course defines negotiation and describes the two main components of any negotiation process. It also presents five different conflict styles that can be expressed in a negotiation and explains how these different styles can be applied given the context in which a negotiation is taking place.

Colombian women mediators taking part in a dialogue in Colombia. Photo by USIP
Colombian women mediators taking part in a dialogue in Colombia. Photo by USIP

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the two main components of any negotiation process;
  • Identify different conflict styles; and
  • Explain how different conflict styles may arise in a negotiation.

 

Overview Video

Click play to watch the overview video.

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Introduces the importance of negotiation through real-world stories and asks the learner to reflect on their prior knowledge.

 

Section 2 - Definitions and Historical Context

Unpacks negotiation by breaking it down both definitionally and practically.

Section 3 - Tools

Discusses crucial things to know before engaging in negotiation and common tools used in practice. 

Section 4 - Application

Examines how to plan and set the scope of negotiation, discusses how to respond when parties say "no," and offers learners a chance to put their skills to the test by completing a scenario.

Section 5 - Conclusion

Provides a space for self-reflection and tests retention while earning a certificate.

 

Instructor

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