This micro-course identifies the importance of media and arts for peace, the critical role of creativity and storytelling, and how media and arts are utilized in post-conflict environments.

Acrylic painting was created on two 24×24 inch canvases to depict war and peace.
Acrylic painting was created on two 24×24 inch canvases to depict war and peace.

Course Overview & Key Objectives

Media and the Arts for Peace is an online, self-paced course that explores the impact of mainstream media, digital/social media, and the arts – live art, street art, music, dance, film, theater, etc. – on peace. Participants learn how these various media have been engaged to enrich public discourse, highlight civic responsibility and social justice, and tell the stories behind every conflict – stories that can be used to either dehumanize or humanize a conflict and the people behind it. 

By the end of this micro-course, participants will be able to achieve the following objectives:

  • Describe how media and the arts contribute to peacebuilding;
  • Consider the impact media and the arts have on the individual and how that may influence peacebuilding;
  • Identify the role media and the arts have in fostering a culture of peace; and
  • Describe the role of media and the arts have in post-conflict societies.

Overview Video

Click on the video below for an overview of the course.

If you cannot view the video, click here.

 

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Discusses how media and arts contribute to peacebuilding.

Section 2 - The Importance of Media and Arts for Peace

Describes the influence media and the arts have on the individual and the importance of it.

Section 3 - Creativity and Storytelling

Describes how creativity and storytelling can be strategies for peace.

Section 4 - Theory & Practice

Describes how those in the field have used Media and Arts to foster a culture of peace.

Section 5 - Media and the Arts in Post-Conflict Environments

Explores how Media and Arts have been used in reconciliation processes, transitional justice, and in healing.

Section 6 - Quiz

Assesses your understanding and retention of key terms, concepts, and ideas presented in this course.

Section 7 - Reflections

Allows you to share what you have learned and read what others have learned from this course and how these skills and knowledge will impact the work we do.

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructor

Guest Experts

  • Dr. Cynthia Cohen, Director of the Program in Peacebuilding and the Arts, Brandeis University
  • Dr. James Gordon, Founder and Executive Director, Center for Mind-Body Medicine
  • Rama Mani, Peace and Security Specialist, Poet and Performance Artist
  • Dr. Lisa Schirch, Senior Research Fellow, Toda Peace Institute

Related Publications

Ethiopia’s Problems Will Not End with a Military Victory

Ethiopia’s Problems Will Not End with a Military Victory

Tuesday, November 24, 2020

By: Aly Verjee

As violence continues over control of the northern Ethiopian region of Tigray, Ethiopia’s future remains unsettled, even if the conflict ends soon. Achieving the federal government’s security objectives in Tigray is unlikely to resolve both new and entrenched political challenges, and already delayed national elections, now expected in 2021, may prove a severe test of Ethiopia’s political order, and consequently affect broader regional stability. Reconciling the electoral process with efforts for reconciliation and national dialogue is now even more imperative.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Looking for Trouble: Sources of Violent Conflict in Central Asia

Looking for Trouble: Sources of Violent Conflict in Central Asia

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

By: Gavin Helf, Ph.D.

This report offers a road map for understanding the most likely sources of violent conflict in the post-Soviet nations of Central Asia—ethno-nationalism and nativism, Islam and secularism, water resources and climate change, and labor migration and economic conflict. The analysis draws from emerging trends in the region and identifies the ways in which Central Asia’s geography and cultural place in the world interact with those trends. It suggests that the policy goals of the United States, Russia, and China in the region may be more compatible than is often assumed.

Type: Special Report

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

The Best Hope for Sustained De-escalation in Syria

The Best Hope for Sustained De-escalation in Syria

Wednesday, November 18, 2020

By: Mona Yacoubian

As the conflict in Syria approaches its 10th anniversary, a holistic political settlement encompassing the entirety of the country is unlikely in the near to medium term. More than eight years of diplomatic initiatives have yielded only limited results. The two principal tracks—the Geneva and the Astana/Sochi processes—are running up against the complexity of the conflict and an emboldened Assad regime; neither process is sufficient on its own to generate momentum toward a lasting political settlement for the whole of Syria. However, creatively bridging these two processes could bring greater stability to those areas of Syria still beyond the Assad regime’s control, assuaging the suffering of some Syrians, and potentially serving as a building block for a longer-term settlement.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

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