This micro-course identifies the importance of media and arts for peace, the critical role of creativity and storytelling, and how media and arts are utilized in post-conflict environments.

Acrylic painting was created on two 24×24 inch canvases to depict war and peace.
Acrylic painting was created on two 24×24 inch canvases to depict war and peace.

Course Overview & Key Objectives

Media and the Arts for Peace is an online, self-paced course that explores the impact of mainstream media, digital/social media, and the arts – live art, street art, music, dance, film, theater, etc. – on peace. Participants learn how these various media have been engaged to enrich public discourse, highlight civic responsibility and social justice, and tell the stories behind every conflict – stories that can be used to either dehumanize or humanize a conflict and the people behind it. 

By the end of this micro-course, participants will be able to achieve the following objectives:

  • Describe how media and the arts contribute to peacebuilding;
  • Consider the impact media and the arts have on the individual and how that may influence peacebuilding;
  • Identify the role media and the arts have in fostering a culture of peace; and
  • Describe the role of media and the arts have in post-conflict societies.

Overview Video

Click on the video below for an overview of the course.

If you cannot view the video, click here.

 

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Introduces the importance of media and arts for peace through real-world stories and asks the learner to reflect on their prior knowledge.

Section 2 - Pillars

Discusses a variety of conceptualizations of how to use media and arts as tools for peace.

Section 3 - Tools

Explores a variety of tools to use media and arts for peace including communication, storytelling, participatory art and music.

Section 4 - Application

Provides learners an opportunity to practice using media and arts in peacebuilding work.

Section 5 - Conclusion

Provides a space for self-reflection and tests retention while earning a certificate.

 

Instructors and Guest Experts

Instructor

Guest Experts

  • Dr. Cynthia Cohen, Director of the Program in Peacebuilding and the Arts, Brandeis University
  • Dr. James Gordon, Founder and Executive Director, Center for Mind-Body Medicine
  • Rama Mani, Peace and Security Specialist, Poet and Performance Artist
  • Dr. Lisa Schirch, Senior Research Fellow, Toda Peace Institute

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