This micro-course provides an overview of the main concepts and challenges that shape the work in the peacebuilding field. It exposes learners to the various tools and types of interventions utilized in the field and provides real-world examples that demonstrate the complex nature of peacebuilding.

UNAMID Head of Office in Sector North, Hassan Gibril, salutes (right) king Yassir, the head of Al-Berti tribe, in his palace in Mellit, Norh Darfur. (Flickr/UNAMID)
UNAMID Head of Office in Sector North, Hassan Gibril, salutes (right) king Yassir, the head of Al-Berti tribe, in his palace in Mellit, Norh Darfur. (Flickr/UNAMID)

Course Overview

By the end of this course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the three main concepts of peacebuilding: peace, conflict, and violence.
  • Identify key peacebuilding priorities.
  • Describe how context and perspective influence the peacebuilding process.
  • Identify the different tools, types of interventions, and strategies for building peace.
  • Recognize that we all have the potential to be peacebuilders.

Overview Video

Click on the video below for an overview of the course.

If you cannot view the video, click here.

 

Agenda

Section 1 - Introduction

Introduces the importance of peacebuilding through real-world stories and asks the learner to reflect on their prior knowledge.

Section 2 - Pillars

Defines the main concepts and priorities of peacebuilding and discusses who can be a peacebuilder.

Section 3 - Tools

Introduces the primary tools and approaches to peacebuilding, and discusses with learners how their work fits into the spectrum of tools or approaches that contribute to peacebuilding efforts.

Section 4 - Application

Explores key themes from the course in further analysis of a case study while also continuing to reflect on how learners might incorporate a peacebuilding lens into their own work or other conflicts.

Section 5 - Conclusion

Provides a space for self-reflection and tests retention while earning a certificate.

Course Instructors and Guest Experts

Course Instructors

Guest Experts

  • Pamela Aall, Senior Advisor, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Jeffrey Helsing, Peacebuilding Consultant & former Associate Vice President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Illana Lancaster, Senior Program Officer, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Nancy Lindborg, former President and CEO, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Alison Milofsky, Director, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Matthew Levinger, Director, National Security Studies Program; Program Director, Master of International Policy and Practice; George Washington University

Related Publications

Myanmar: China, the Coup and the Future

Myanmar: China, the Coup and the Future

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

By: Jason Tower; Priscilla A. Clapp

In making major deals with Myanmar’s military rulers, China seems to be violating its official guidance for investment abroad: Avoid conflict zones. Although Myanmar is in a state of collapse and widening rebellion, China continues to advance plans for a complex economic corridor in the country with the military unveiling steps to move ahead with big joint-venture projects. The generals’ bid to appear in control of things is obvious. China, on the other hand, seems to have fallen into a trap. Cozying up to the junta puts its investments at immediate and long-term risk and erodes its standing in regional organizations. To protect its interests, Beijing should press the junta to curb its rampant violence against the population and to restore the elected government.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Economics & Environment; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Washington’s Allies and Partners Weigh in on U.S.-China Competition

Washington’s Allies and Partners Weigh in on U.S.-China Competition

Thursday, June 3, 2021

By: Patricia M. Kim

The Biden administration has adopted an overarching strategy of renewing relations with allies and partners to counter China where necessary, while also cooperating with Beijing when it is in the United States’ interest to so. As competition between Washington and Beijing heats up, however, avenues to resolve conflicts peacefully between the two major powers remain limited. A recent USIP report brought together U.S. and Chinese authors to offer recommendations on how the two powers can enhance strategic stability. But how do U.S. allies and partners factor in and what steps would they like Washington and Beijing to take to prevent conflict and manage crises? 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Understanding Organized Crime and Violence in Central Asia

Understanding Organized Crime and Violence in Central Asia

Tuesday, June 1, 2021

By: Lawrence P. Markowitz; Mariya Y. Omelicheva

The influence of organized crime on governance and the rule of law in Central Asia has long been recognized, but its role in violence is less broadly understood. Looking at conflicts in Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, and Tajikistan, this report examines the ways that organized criminal actors exploit popular mobilization (such as protests) and weaken state controls in episodes of violence. Recommendations for governments, international agencies, and civil society groups draw from expert interviews and research to address the range of organized criminal motives and circumstances.

Type: Special Report

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All Publications