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To Help Central Asia, Engage with Muslim Civil Society

To Help Central Asia, Engage with Muslim Civil Society

Wednesday, January 12, 2022

By: James Rupert

Kazakhstan’s violent upheaval this month underscores that governments and international organizations need to more effectively help Central Asia’s 76 million people build responsive, effective governance across their five nations. Mass protests or communal violence also have struck Uzbekistan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan in recent years. As the United States, allied governments and international institutions seek ways to promote nonviolent transitions toward more stable, democratic rule, new research suggests that they explore for partners in an often-ignored sector—Central Asia’s active and disparate Muslim civil society.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceReligion

Engaging with Muslim Civil Society in Central Asia: Components, Approaches, and Opportunities

Engaging with Muslim Civil Society in Central Asia: Components, Approaches, and Opportunities

Friday, December 10, 2021

By: Sebastien Peyrouse;  Emil Nasritdinov

When Western policymakers and development practitioners turn their attention to Central Asia, they too often overlook Muslim civil society as a potential partner for addressing the region’s economic and social problems. This report, which is based on dozens of interviews with representatives of Muslim civil society organizations in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan, is intended to help generate a much-needed conversation about Muslim civil society in Central Asia and how Western donors and practitioners can begin tapping their potential.

Type: Peaceworks

Democracy & Governance

Processes of Reintegrating Central Asian Returnees from Syria and Iraq

Processes of Reintegrating Central Asian Returnees from Syria and Iraq

Wednesday, July 21, 2021

By: William B. Farrell;  Rustam Burnashev;  Rustam Azizi;  Bakhtiyar Babadjanov

In the wake of the loss of the Islamic State’s territorial holdings, the return of foreign fighters and their families to their home countries is a top international concern. Among the short list of governments that have initiated repatriation programs, the Central Asian republics of Kazakhstan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan stand out. This report examines the different approaches the three countries have taken and draws important lessons for other nations considering their own repatriation and reintegration programs.

Type: Special Report

Violent Extremism

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