Somalia’s Critical Transition Comes amid al-Shabab and Hunger Challenges

Somalia’s Critical Transition Comes amid al-Shabab and Hunger Challenges

Wednesday, June 1, 2022

By: Susan Stigant

On May 15, Somali legislators selected former president Hassan Sheikh Mohamud to reprise the chief executive role he played from 2012-2017. The vote marks a critical transition for Somalia and in the Horn of Africa, particularly after the election was delayed by two years and marred by corruption and violence. President Hassan Sheikh will return to power in a country seemingly splitting at the seams, amid a devastating drought, a metastasizing terrorist threat and a fractious political scene. Meanwhile, President Biden has decided to redeploy U.S. troops to fight the terrorist group al-Shabab, reversing a move made by President Trump at the end of his term.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & GovernanceViolent Extremism

Ethiopia’s Truce Offers Hope, But the Next Steps Are Complex

Ethiopia’s Truce Offers Hope, But the Next Steps Are Complex

Thursday, March 31, 2022

By: Susan Stigant

After 16 months, one of Africa’s deadliest wars has yielded an opportunity to build peace, as Ethiopia’s government and the Tigray Defense Forces have declared a truce to allow for the humanitarian aid needed to prevent mass starvation across the country’s northeast. Ethiopians and their supporters must seize this moment to consolidate a durable cease-fire and end blockages to humanitarian assistance. This effort should open a path to a broad national dialogue to set a shared vision for Ethiopia’s future, growth potential and long-term stability. But the essential first steps are complex and will need to be taken carefully and swiftly.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Susan Stigant on the Deepening Conflict in Ethiopia

Susan Stigant on the Deepening Conflict in Ethiopia

Wednesday, November 10, 2021

By: Susan Stigant

As rebel forces march toward Ethiopia’s capital in a bid to end the government blockade of the Tigray region, USIP’s Susan Stigant says there is a “risk that this logic of violence could tilt into a much deeper civil war.” In the meantime, Washington should keep trying to “get people to a table and agree to a pause.”

Type: Podcast

إعادة عملية الانتقال السياسي في السودان إلى مسارها الصحيح

إعادة عملية الانتقال السياسي في السودان إلى مسارها الصحيح

Friday, December 17, 2021

By: Susan Stigant

قد حكم الجيش السودان لمدة 53 عامًا من أصل 66 عامًا مضت منذ حصوله على الاستقلال عام 1955. وفي 25 أكتوبر/تشرين الاول استولى الجيش، في حركة مألوفة على السلطة مما ألقى بظلال من الشك على التحول السياسي الذي من شأنه أن يؤدي إلى حكم مدني. وتم حل القيادة المدنية واعتقال قادتها وإعلان حالة الطوارئ. واستشهد قائد الانقلاب الجنرال عبد الفتاح برهان بمبررات بالية لتبرير أفعاله. وفي وقت لاحق أعيد رئيس الوزراء المخلوع عبد الله حمدوك إلى رئاسة حكومة تكنوقراطية إلى أن يحين موعد الانتخابات المقرر إجراؤها في يوليو/تموز 2023.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Civilian-Military RelationsDemocracy & Governance

Putting Sudan’s Political Transition Back on Track

Putting Sudan’s Political Transition Back on Track

Thursday, December 9, 2021

By: Susan Stigant

Sudan has been ruled by the military for 53 of the 66 years since it gained independence in 1955. On October 25, the military, in a familiar move, seized power throwing into question the political transition that would result in civilian rule. The civilian cabinet was dissolved, its leaders arrested and a state of emergency declared. Coup leader Gen. Abdel Fattah Burhan cited well-worn excuses to justify his actions. Ousted Prime Minister Abdalla Hamdok was later reinstated to lead a technocratic cabinet until elections scheduled for July 2023.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Civilian-Military RelationsDemocracy & Governance

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Dialogues nationaux sur la consolidation de la paix et les transitions créativité et pensée adaptative

Monday, December 13, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Susan Stigant

Dans le meilleur des cas, les processus de dialogue national promettent d’apporter un élan décisif à la transformation inclusive du conflit. Ce rapport examine les dialogues dans six pays: la République Centrafricaine, le Kenya, le Liban, le Sénégal, la Tunisie et le Yémen. Ces divers processus montrent les possibilités de favoriser le dialogue, de forger des accords et de progresser vers la paix; et le rapport offre des conseils détaillés sur les possibilités et les aspects pratiques pour ceux qui envisagent d'organiser un dialogue national.

Type: Peaceworks

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

National Dialogues in Peacebuilding and Transitions: Creativity and Adaptive Thinking

National Dialogues in Peacebuilding and Transitions: Creativity and Adaptive Thinking

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

By: Elizabeth Murray;  Susan Stigant;  (editors)

At their best, national dialogues hold the promise of adding critical momentum in the drive to transform conflict inclusively. This report examines dialogues in six countries—the Central African Republic, Kenya, Lebanon, Senegal, Tunisia, and Yemen. These diverse processes show the possibilities for fostering dialogue, forging agreements, and driving toward peace; and the report offers extensive guidance on the possibilities and practicalities for those considering convening a national dialogue.

Type: Peaceworks

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Tanzania Gets a Woman as President: That’s an Opportunity

Tanzania Gets a Woman as President: That’s an Opportunity

Thursday, March 25, 2021

By: USIP Staff

Samia Suluhu Hassan, who became Tanzania’s sixth president this month following the death of her predecessor, has an opportunity to promote stability for her nation of 58 million people, say analysts and women activists in East Africa. As Tanzania confronts COVID and political division, Hassan could expand a history of African women leaders who have advanced stability and peace in moments of crisis. Her elevation also could boost grassroots movements across East Africa—including a new network of women leaders in Tanzania—that are strengthening peace and security through greater inclusion of women in public life.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

GenderDemocracy & Governance