Susan Stigant on Mali’s Military Coup

Susan Stigant on Mali’s Military Coup

Wednesday, August 26, 2020

By: Susan Stigant

After months of public protests, a military coup has toppled Mali’s government. USIP’s Susan Stigant looks at the path forward, saying “there’s a real tension in trying to figure out how to restore that constitutional order without necessarily going back to the status quo prior to the coup.”

Type: Podcast

Democracy & Governance

Nobel Laureate Abiy Ahmed’s Next Peacebuilding Project Should be at Home

Nobel Laureate Abiy Ahmed’s Next Peacebuilding Project Should be at Home

Thursday, November 14, 2019

By: Susan Stigant

Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed has remained in the news in the weeks following his 2019 Nobel Peace Prize—but not for the reasons you’d expect. An estimated 86 people have died in violence sparked by an alleged assassination attempt against a prominent political opposition leader. This tragedy is symptomatic of Ethiopia’s fragile transition and demonstrates the urgency for Dr. Abiy to focus his energies at home to deliver a peaceful transition for the 105 million Ethiopians counting on his leadership.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

Susan Stigant on Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Susan Stigant on Ethiopia’s Nobel Peace Prize Winner

Wednesday, October 16, 2019

By: Susan Stigant

Last week, Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for his diplomatic engagement with neighboring Eritrea and initiating a host of domestic reforms. USIP’s Susan Stigant explains how the award shines a light on his accomplishments and “sets an expectation that he will continue to provide that leadership going forward."

Type: Podcast

Peace Processes; Reconciliation

A Year After the Ethiopia-Eritrea Peace Deal, What Is the Impact?

A Year After the Ethiopia-Eritrea Peace Deal, What Is the Impact?

Thursday, August 29, 2019

By: Susan Stigant; Michael V. Phelan

Ethiopia and Eritrea signed a peace agreement just over a year ago to end two decades of a “frozen war.” The accord, which resolved a seemingly intractable border dispute after Ethiopian Prime Minister Abiy Ahmed took office and accepted an independent commission’s 2002 boundary decision, was greeted with tremendous optimism in both countries and by international observers.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes; Reconciliation