Political Stability in Afghanistan: A 2020 Vision and Roadmap

Political Stability in Afghanistan: A 2020 Vision and Roadmap

Monday, July 10, 2017

By: Alex Thier ; Scott Worden

Sixteen years after the start of the international intervention in Afghanistan, the country remains beset by a debilitating array of conflicts, undermined political stability, an economic and security decline since the withdrawal of a majority of international forces, and a divided government since the 2014 elections. As the US government, its partners, and NATO consider...

Democracy & Governance; Fragility and Resilience; Global Policy

Lessons from Cambodia’s Paris Peace Accords for Political Unrest Today

Lessons from Cambodia’s Paris Peace Accords for Political Unrest Today

Tuesday, May 16, 2017

By: Laura McGrew; Scott Worden

In December 2016, to mark the twenty-fifth anniversary of the 1991 Paris Peace Agreement that ended the decade-long war between Cambodia and Vietnam, USIP hosted a conference to examine the implementation of that agreement and how the decisions made in the past have affected increasing political unrest in the country. Panelists included several key actors...

Peace Processes

Afghan Women Defy Taliban in a City on the Edge

Afghan Women Defy Taliban in a City on the Edge

Monday, February 20, 2017

By: James Rupert

Kunduz once bustled as the cotton-mill capital of northeast Afghanistan. Amid Afghanistan’s 39-year-old war, it is now half-empty, fearful and bullet-pocked—a target in the Taliban’s fight to capture a major city. Remarkably, Kunduz also is a stronghold of Afghanistan’s women’s movement, including a handful of women-run radio stations. So when Taliban fighters briefly seized Kunduz in 2015 and attacked it again last year, they tried each time to kill Sediqa Sherzai, a journalist and mother who runs Radio Roshani.

Violent Extremism; Gender; Religion; Nonviolent Action

South Asia: Rising Extremism Opens Way for ISIS

South Asia: Rising Extremism Opens Way for ISIS

Tuesday, May 9, 2017

By: Fred Strasser

Across South Asia, complex strains of extremism are opening the way for the Islamic State and destabilizing governments. From elements in the Afghan Taliban to the ascent of Hindu nationalism in India, extremists are drawing the region deeper into volatile internal and external conflicts, according to experts on religion and extremism speaking recently at the U.S. Institute of Peace. There are no quick ways to reverse the trend, they said. But steps that could slow radicalization include bolstering free speech, attacking terrorists’ financial networks and undermining the myth that a long-ago caliphate ruled over a perfect society.

Violent Extremism; Global Policy

Afghan Universities Build a Movement Against Extremism

Afghan Universities Build a Movement Against Extremism

Tuesday, April 4, 2017

By: Joshua Levkowitz

When students at Afghanistan’s Nangarhar University organized a blood drive last fall to protest their country’s civil war, so many donors lined up that the blood bags ran out. “Stop Bloodshed and Donate Blood to Save Lives,” the event declared. On a campus where some students have demonstrated in support of the Taliban and the Islamic State (ISIS), the rally against violence became a story on local radio and television, and on social media.

Education & Training; Violent Extremism

U.S. Afghanistan Veterans Recall the Costs of War

U.S. Afghanistan Veterans Recall the Costs of War

Wednesday, March 1, 2017

By: USIP Staff

When we estimate the costs of wars, our guesses can render figures too vast and numbing to really grasp. Brown University’s Costs of War project estimates that wars since 2001 involving U.S. forces have cost $4.8 trillion, 370,000 people killed in direct violence and nearly 1.2 million dead when indirect causes are counted. At the U.S. Institute of Peace on Feb. 22, a prominent journalist and U.S. combat veterans focused on a tiny but dramatic subset of costs—the price paid by these former soldiers when they were sent a decade ago to a perilous corner of Afghanistan.

Civilian-Military Relations

Foreign Policy Priorities for the Trump Administration

Foreign Policy Priorities for the Trump Administration

Thursday, January 5, 2017

By: USIP Staff

As Donald J. Trump prepares for his inauguration as president on Jan. 20, he and his incoming foreign policy team face the full array of global challenges confronting the United States. They’ll have to determine what should demand their immediate attention and where strategic investments might pay big dividends. In this series of brief video interviews, four U.S. Institute of Peace experts offer their recommendations. They spoke ahead of USIP’s Passing the Baton conference, which will convene Cabinet-level and other senior foreign policy and national security figures from the outgoing and incoming administrations for meetings on January 9 and 10. 

Global Policy