On behalf of the co-chairs of the National Defense Panel, the United States Institute of Peace, the facilitating organization of the Panel, releases the following statement:

Today, we, the co-chairs of the National Defense Panel, are pleased to announce the completion of our panel’s work and the release of its report on the 2014 Quadrennial Defense Review.  Congress and the Department of Defense requested this independent and non-partisan review of this critical document on America’s national defense posture and we are pleased that the Panel produced a consensus report.

We wish to thank both the Department of Defense and the Congress for its support of our work over the last 11 months.  The cooperative spirit on the part of all who participated in our work set an excellent backdrop for the many energetic and detailed discussions of the Panel.  Such bi-partisan cooperation made the work of the Panel all the more effective.  We thank our fellow panelists for their expert contributions and patience throughout this long process; they also deserve America’s thanks for their enduring dedication to the many issues of our nation’s defense.

Our report stands on its own findings and recommendations.  There were no dissenting opinions.  This is a consensus report.  We urge both the Congress and the Department to take our recommendations to heart and expeditiously act on them.  Our national security policies have served the nation well and every American has benefited from them.  We must act now to address our challenges if the nation is to continue benefiting from its national security posture.  This report examines our current and future security challenges and provides recommendations for ensuring a strong U.S. defense for the future.

William J. Perry                                              John P. Abizaid
Co-Chair                                                         Co-Chair

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The Biden-Putin Summit: A Chance to Agree—and Disagree

Tuesday, June 15, 2021

By: James Rupert; Donald N. Jensen, Ph.D.

While Presidents Biden and Putin meet amid the strained U.S.-Russian relations in a generation, this week’s summit could yield moves to rebuild predictability in that relationship, especially new steps to address rising global risks to stability and security. Even as the United States confronts Putin over his wielding of selective chaos as a foreign policy crowbar, both sides share an interest in managing disparate international threats—from the weakening of the limits on nuclear weapons and the emergence of new high technology weapons, to climate change and COVID. The summit could reopen dialogue on such challenges.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Practicing Peace and Conflict Diplomacy in a Complex World

Practicing Peace and Conflict Diplomacy in a Complex World

Monday, June 14, 2021

By: Ashish Kumar Sen

A combination of a weakening liberal international order, sharpening U.S.-China rivalry, growing transnational threats, shrinking space for civil society and rising nationalism and populism has complicated the practice of peace and conflict diplomacy. A new volume of essays examines approaches to such diplomacy in this complex environment.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

10 Things to Know: Biden’s Approach to the Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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Thursday, June 10, 2021

By: Ambassador Hesham Youssef

Coming into office, the Biden administration was clear that the Middle East would largely take a backseat in its foreign policy agenda. But recent developments in Jerusalem and the 11-day war on Gaza forced the Israeli-Palestinian conflict back into the forefront of international attention and revealed elements of the administration’s approach to the conflict. U.S. policy on the conflict has long been a point of bipartisan harmony, with more consensus than contention. The Biden administration’s emerging policy largely aligns with past administrations’ policies, with a few notable differences. But can this approach advance peace amid this protracted conflict?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Peace Processes

Tribunal Gives Voice to China’s Uyghurs Amid International Gridlock

Tribunal Gives Voice to China’s Uyghurs Amid International Gridlock

Thursday, June 10, 2021

By: Lauren Baillie; Rachel Vandenbrink

Over the past week, members of China’s ethnic Uyghur minority have provided moving testimony about their persecution to the Uyghur Tribunal, an unofficial, civil society-led investigation into possible genocide and crimes against humanity committed by Beijing. Although the “people’s tribunal” is not backed by any government and its findings will not be binding on any country, the hearings play an important role in providing recognition to victims’ suffering and in strengthening the legal argument for a U.N. Commission of Inquiry or other international accountability mechanisms. As such, the tribunal serves as an important tool for civil society to move atrocity prevention efforts forward when U.N. or international court action is blocked.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights

A Global Democratic Renaissance or a More Volatile World?

A Global Democratic Renaissance or a More Volatile World?

Thursday, June 10, 2021

By: Anthony Navone

With a staggering array of immediate crises facing the world — from the COVID pandemic to a global increase in extremist violence — it sometimes feels difficult, perhaps even impossible, to look beyond the current moment and envision what the world will look in the coming decades. However, looming demographic, economic, environmental and technological shifts are already starting to affect the global geopolitical environment — not only worsening our current crises, but inciting new ones should we fail to put in place long-term strategies to address them.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

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