USIP President Jim Marshall recently led a U.S. delegation to two Track 1.5 dialogues in Beijing aimed at moving quickly beyond intractable official government statements and finding ways for de-escalating tensions in East Asia.

20130711-5thPCACGroupPhoto-NF.jpg
Front row, left to right: ADM Gary Roughead (USN, ret.), CICIR President Ji Zhiye, USIP President Jim Marshall, Dr. Wu Xinbo, RADM Yang Yi (PLA Navy, ret.)

The U.S. delegation led by Marshall in late June included: Stephen Hadley, USIP senior advisor for international affairs and former national security advisor; Admiral Gary Roughead, former chief of Naval Operations; John Park, USIP senior Asia advisor; and a group of Pentagon and State Department officials.

USIP’s formulation and practice of “Track 1.5” diplomacy involves policy exchanges among select current and former policymakers, military officers, and policy experts.  By comparison, “Track 1” diplomacy typically involves high-level government and military representatives involved in official negotiations.  “Track 2” dialogues involve only non-governmental representatives who meet to build relationships and formulate recommendations and ideas that can be considered during the official diplomatic process.

The first meeting in Beijing was the fifth U.S.-China Project on Crisis Avoidance and Cooperation (PCAC) Track 1.5 Dialogue, which included a Chinese delegation led by the China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations.

The second meeting was the second U.S.-China-Japan Track 1.5 Dialogue on Risk Reduction and Crisis Prevention (R2CP) with an additional Japanese delegation led by the Institute for International Policy Studies.

By convening recurring Track 1.5 dialogues, USIP fosters a deeper understanding of policy perspectives, generates policy proposals, and facilitates policy impact by helping to operationalize these proposals. You can learn more about USIP’s Track 1.5 work here.  

Related Publications

Can Soft Power Work in a Sharp Power World?

Can Soft Power Work in a Sharp Power World?

Friday, November 30, 2018

By: Anthony Miller

Speaking at USIP’s seventh Bipartisan Congressional Dialogue, Rep. Francis Rooney (R-FL) and Rep. Don Beyer (D-VA) discussed the threat posed by sharp power to global stability and how the United States, through bipartisan efforts, could use soft power to counter this threat.

Democracy & Governance; Global Policy

Securing China’s Belt and Road Initiative

Securing China’s Belt and Road Initiative

Monday, November 26, 2018

By: Zi Yang

USIP’s new Special Report provides an overview of the different security arrangements China is using to protect its overseas investments and workers, and examines how the Belt and Road Initiative is spurring the rapid growth of China’s domestic private security industry.

Economics & Environment

Vikram Singh on the South China Sea

Vikram Singh on the South China Sea

Thursday, October 25, 2018

By: Vikram J. Singh

With trillions in goods moving through the South China Sea annually, it’s arguably the most important shipping lane on the planet, says Vikram Singh. While China says that it wants to keep the sea free and open for trade, most worryingly for the United States, Beijing has claimed it can deny access to military vessels, challenging the U.S.’ ability to maintain a balance of power in the region.

Economics & Environment; Global Policy

View All Publications