This brief looks at what is driving the fighting in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains. Journalist Julie Flint has written extensively on Sudan, reporting on the Nuba Mountains since 1992. This piece is based on her most recent visit, in September.

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Summary

  • The response to the renewed war in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains has been driven largely by a human rights and humanitarian crisis.
  • The crisis will continue indefinitely without a political agreement that acknowledges the Nuba rebellion is self-sustaining and reflects a wider malaise within the new Republic of Sudan.
  • With Sudan facing financial collapse, economic normalization must be part of negotiations with Khartoum to end the war in the Nuba Mountains and promote democratization throughout Sudan.

About This Brief

This brief looks at what is driving the fighting in Sudan’s Nuba Mountains. Journalist Julie Flint has written extensively on Sudan, reporting on the Nuba Mountains since 1992. This piece is based on her most recent visit, in September.

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