Physicians for Human Rights, with support from USIP, developed this web-based distance-learning course in the forensic sciences. It targets a wide audience, from less experienced volunteer human rights investigators to expert international professionals. In addition to collecting physical evidence, the course also covers working with families and communities affected by violence. Regular 'quizzes' and exercises encourage trainees to reflect on the material that they have been exposed to and help ensure the learning objectives are met.

Forensic Training for Human Rights and Humanitarian Investigations
Physicians for Human Rights, with support from USIP, developed this web-based distance-learning course in the forensic sciences. It targets a wide audience, from less experienced volunteer human rights investigators to expert international professionals. In addition to collecting physical evidence, the course also covers working with families and communities affected by violence. Regular 'quizzes' and exercises encourage trainees to reflect on the material that they have been exposed to and help ensure the learning objectives are met.

Latest Publications

After Bashir, A New Dawn in Sudan? (Part 1)

After Bashir, A New Dawn in Sudan? (Part 1)

Wednesday, April 17, 2019

By: Susan Stigant; Elizabeth Murray

Longtime Sudanese dictator Omar al-Bashir was ousted last Thursday, 30 years after he took power in the same fashion he was overthrown: by a military coup. The military takeover was spurred by months of popular protests over rising food prices, economic mismanagement and demands...

Democracy & Governance

Myanmar’s 2020 Elections and Conflict Dynamics

Myanmar’s 2020 Elections and Conflict Dynamics

Monday, April 15, 2019

By: Mary Callahan; Myo Zaw Oo

In late 2020, Myanmar will hold a general election for more than a thousand seats in Union, state, and regional legislative bodies. The next year and a half will also see two high-level, conflict-laden processes capture domestic and international attention—the 21st Century Panglong peace conference and possible attempts to repatriate Rohingya refugees. This report evaluates the environment in which the peace process, Rohingya repatriation, and the election intersect and identifies opportunities for mitigating conflict in the run-up to the election.

Electoral Violence; Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

Q&A: Libya’s Sudden New Risk of War

Q&A: Libya’s Sudden New Risk of War

Friday, April 12, 2019

By: Nathaniel L. Wilson; USIP Staff

Just as the United Nations was preparing to host a national conference in Libya this month to arrange for national elections to unify the country’s fractured governance, the faction that dominates the country’s east, the Libyan National Army, launched a military offensive last week on the capital, Tripoli. With the past week’s fighting, “the likelihood is greater than at any point since 2014 for destructive and bloody conflict” of an uncertain duration and outcome, according to Nate Wilson, who manages USIP programs in Libya. Wilson monitors Libya from neighboring Tunisia while working with Libyan officials, researchers on projects to inform international policymakers, and with local Libyan groups that work to reconcile disputes and build a foundation for national peacemaking. In response to questions, he discussed what’s at stake in the new fighting, and how the international community might respond.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

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