This strategic framework, one in a series of peacebuilding frameworks being developed by USIP, provides a sophisticated, but easily understandable way of conceptualizing conflict prevention. The framework is organized around a desired end state of "stable peace." The core of the framework is found in the leadership responsibilities and key objectives. The key objectives are divided into three broad, potentially complementary preventive strategies—mitigate global risks, mitigate societal risks, halt and reverse escalation—and a series of objectives under each. The framework is designed to be useful to a wide range of conflict prevention practitioners—from policymakers to local field workers.

This strategic framework, one in a series of peacebuilding frameworks being developed by USIP, provides a sophisticated, but easily understandable way of conceptualizing conflict prevention. The framework is organized around a desired end state of "stable peace." The core of the framework is found in the leadership responsibilities and key objectives. The key objectives are divided into three broad, potentially complementary preventive strategies—mitigate global risks, mitigate societal risks, halt and reverse escalation—and a series of objectives under each. The framework is designed to be useful to a wide range of conflict prevention practitioners—from policymakers to local field workers.

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