This study guide is designed to serve independent learners who want to find out more about international conflict and its resolution, as well as educators who want to introduce the topic to their students.

Youth and Violent Conflict Study Guide

This study guide series is designed to serve independent learners who want to find out more about international conflict and its resolution, as well as educators who want to introduce specifics topics in their courses. The main text of each guide briefly discusses the most important issues concerning the topic at hand, especially those issues that are related to the critical task of managing conflicts and building international peace.

Features of the study guide include:

  • Main text that discusses the the prevalence of youth participation in violent conflict and the challenges to addressing this global issue.
  • Glossary of terms.
  • Discussion questions and activities to encourage critical thinking and active learning.
  • List of readings and multimedia resources for additional investigation and learning opportunities.

The study guide can be used by teachers and students to:

  • Increase understanding of the complex environment of conflict and the roles that youth can play.
  • Become familiar with strategies for conflict prevention, management, and resolution.
  • Develop students’ analytical reading, writing, and research skills.
  • Reinforce students’ abilities to produce a work product using traditional and electronic means of research, discussion, and document preparation.
  • Locate lessons, bibliographic sources, factual materials, and multimedia resources to assist students in writing essays for submission to the National Peace Essay Contest.

 

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