Below are links by topical categories to resources primarily in English providing information on terrorism/counter-terrorism. For more information on specific regions, see Regional Resources.

These links complement the following USIP Special Reports:

  1. How Terrorism Ends
  2. Options for Prosecuting International Terrorists
  3. The Diplomacy of Counterterrorism: Lessons Learned, Ignored and Disputed
  4. Global Terrorism after the Iraq War
  5. Terrorism in the Horn of Africa
  6. www.terror.net: How Modern Terrorism Uses the Internet
  7. Cyberterrorism: How Real Is the Threat?
  8. U.S.-China Cooperation on the Problem of Failing States and Transnational Threats
  9. Who Are the Insurgents? Sunni Arab Rebels in Iraq

These links also support the Teaching Guide on International Terrorism: Definitions, Causes and Responses produced by the Institute's Education Program.

General Resources

Government Agencies and International Organizations

Israel

  • Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    The home page of the web site features sections on terrorism and the Israeli response. A search on "terrorism" as a keyword yields, among other documents, the full text of addresses, speeches, and interviews of Israeli leaders, as well as United Nations Security Council and General Assembly resolutions on international terrorism.

United Kingdom

United Nations

United States

Political Organizations

  • Fateh Organization Website
    Fateh is the largest faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the largest political party in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). Founded as an armed group to battle Israel, the organization and its head, Yasser Arafat, have become leaders in the Palestinian community advocating a negotiated solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict. The organization's web site includes some items in English, such as editorials, statements, publications, and related links.
  • Palestinian National Authority (PNA)
    The Palestinian National Authority governs the Palestinian autonomous areas established under the Oslo Accords or Declaration of Principles of September 1993, and conducts international negotiations on behalf of Palestinians. This web site includes documents (reports, press releases, commentary and editorials), maps, and contains sections on the Peace Process, International Relations, Palestine and UN, On the Ground, Building the State, and Government. Links to the Palestinian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
  • Sinn Fein
    Sinn Fein is widely regarded to be the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, and Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams was a party to the negotiations which resulted in the Good Friday Accords of April 1998. The party's web site describes Sinn Fein's objectives, includes official documents and press releases, links to documents on the peace talks, election information, related web sites and a political weekly newspaper An Phlobacht/Republican News.

Research Studies and Projects

Selected Documents and Publications

Updated: July 21, 2005

Latest Publications

Rival Afghan Leaders Agree to Share Power—Now Comes the Hard Part

Rival Afghan Leaders Agree to Share Power—Now Comes the Hard Part

Thursday, May 21, 2020

By: Scott Worden; Johnny Walsh

Last weekend, Afghan President Ashraf Ghani and rival Abdullah Abdullah signed a power-sharing deal to end a months-long dispute over the 2019 presidential election. The deal comes amid a spate of high-profile violence, including a recent attack on a Kabul maternity ward by suspected ISIS perpetrators. Meanwhile, the Afghan peace process has stalled since the U.S.-Taliban deal signed at the end of February. The power-sharing agreement could address one of the key challenges to getting that process back on track. USIP’s Scott Worden and Johnny Walsh look at what the agreement entails and what it means for the peace process.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

Diplomacy, Development and Defense Officials Pledge To Advance U.S. Fragility Strategy

Diplomacy, Development and Defense Officials Pledge To Advance U.S. Fragility Strategy

Thursday, May 21, 2020

By: Corinne Graff; Amanda Long

The United States is committed to advancing the Global Fragility Act (GFA) as part of its global response to the coronavirus pandemic, senior State Department, USAID and Department of Defense officials said on Wednesday at a virtual gathering of development and peacebuilding organizations and experts convened by the U.S. Institute of Peace to facilitate discussions on how to implement the legislation.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience; Global Health

China’s Periphery Diplomacy: Implications for Peace and Security in Asia

China’s Periphery Diplomacy: Implications for Peace and Security in Asia

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

By: Jacob Stokes

China’s foreign policy is expanding in scope and depth and now reaches across the globe. Yet its diplomatic efforts focus on its own complex neighborhood. To advance these interests, China’s leaders practice an interlocking set of foreign affairs activities they refer to as “periphery diplomacy.” This report details the main tools Beijing uses to engage the countries with which it shares borders, assesses the campaign’s effectiveness, and lays out the implications for peace and security in Asia.

Type: Special Report

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Scott Worden on the Afghan Power-Sharing Deal

Scott Worden on the Afghan Power-Sharing Deal

Wednesday, May 20, 2020

By: Scott Worden

A political deal to resolve the disputed 2019 presidential election was finally reached over the weekend. USIP’s Scott Worden says the agreement “is quite significant” because it will give the Afghan side “more political coherence to negotiate with the Taliban and, if implemented, it will show the Taliban they can’t divide Afghans.”

Type: Podcast

Democracy & Governance

Why the U.S. Military Presence in Africa is Vital Beyond Counterterrorism

Why the U.S. Military Presence in Africa is Vital Beyond Counterterrorism

Tuesday, May 19, 2020

By: Judd Devermont; Leanne Erdberg Steadman

Since Defense Secretary Mark Esper announced a potential drawdown of U.S. troops in Africa, U.S. congressional leaders, military officers and various commentators have defended the importance of the military in Africa. But they’ve focused almost exclusively on the fight against terrorism. This is not surprising, since the public has for decades really only heard about the U.S. military in Africa when drone strikes hit terrorists in Somalia, when Navy SEALS raid pirate ships in the Gulf of Aden, and when Army Rangers hunt down genocidaires in the jungle.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Violent Extremism; Global Policy

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