Below are links by topical categories to resources primarily in English providing information on terrorism/counter-terrorism. For more information on specific regions, see Regional Resources.

These links complement the following USIP Special Reports:

  1. How Terrorism Ends
  2. Options for Prosecuting International Terrorists
  3. The Diplomacy of Counterterrorism: Lessons Learned, Ignored and Disputed
  4. Global Terrorism after the Iraq War
  5. Terrorism in the Horn of Africa
  6. www.terror.net: How Modern Terrorism Uses the Internet
  7. Cyberterrorism: How Real Is the Threat?
  8. U.S.-China Cooperation on the Problem of Failing States and Transnational Threats
  9. Who Are the Insurgents? Sunni Arab Rebels in Iraq

These links also support the Teaching Guide on International Terrorism: Definitions, Causes and Responses produced by the Institute's Education Program.

General Resources

Government Agencies and International Organizations

Israel

  • Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs
    The home page of the web site features sections on terrorism and the Israeli response. A search on "terrorism" as a keyword yields, among other documents, the full text of addresses, speeches, and interviews of Israeli leaders, as well as United Nations Security Council and General Assembly resolutions on international terrorism.

United Kingdom

United Nations

United States

Political Organizations

  • Fateh Organization Website
    Fateh is the largest faction of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the largest political party in the Palestinian National Authority (PNA). Founded as an armed group to battle Israel, the organization and its head, Yasser Arafat, have become leaders in the Palestinian community advocating a negotiated solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict. The organization's web site includes some items in English, such as editorials, statements, publications, and related links.
  • Palestinian National Authority (PNA)
    The Palestinian National Authority governs the Palestinian autonomous areas established under the Oslo Accords or Declaration of Principles of September 1993, and conducts international negotiations on behalf of Palestinians. This web site includes documents (reports, press releases, commentary and editorials), maps, and contains sections on the Peace Process, International Relations, Palestine and UN, On the Ground, Building the State, and Government. Links to the Palestinian Ministry of Foreign Affairs.
  • Sinn Fein
    Sinn Fein is widely regarded to be the political wing of the Irish Republican Army, and Sinn Fein leader Gerry Adams was a party to the negotiations which resulted in the Good Friday Accords of April 1998. The party's web site describes Sinn Fein's objectives, includes official documents and press releases, links to documents on the peace talks, election information, related web sites and a political weekly newspaper An Phlobacht/Republican News.

Research Studies and Projects

Selected Documents and Publications

Updated: July 21, 2005

Latest Publications

What are the Prospects for Power-Sharing in the Afghan Peace Process?

What are the Prospects for Power-Sharing in the Afghan Peace Process?

Monday, September 16, 2019

By: Alex Thier

While the negotiations between the U.S. and the Taliban were recently thrown-off course, a peace agreement among Afghans remains an urgent priority. The U.S.-led negotiations over a phased drawdown of U.S. troops in exchange for a Taliban commitment to eschew terrorism and engage in intra-Afghan negotiations took nearly a year. Yet these talks excluded the Afghan government and other political elites and didn’t address the fundamental question of what it will take for Afghans to put a sustainable end to four decades of war: how will power be shared?

Peace Processes

A Rift Over Afghan Aid Imperils Prospects for Peace

A Rift Over Afghan Aid Imperils Prospects for Peace

Monday, September 16, 2019

By: William Byrd

As the United States has pursued peace talks with the Taliban, international discussions continue on the economic aid that will be vital to stabilizing Afghanistan under any peace deal. Yet the Afghan government has been mostly absent from this dialogue, an exclusion exemplified this week by a meeting of the country’s main donors to strategize on aid—with Afghan officials left out. The government’s marginalization, in large part self-inflicted, is a danger to the stabilization and development of Afghanistan. In the interests of Afghans, stability in the region and U.S. hopes for a sustainable peace, this rift in the dialogue on aid needs to be repaired.

Economics & Environment

Negotiations, Continued: Ensuring the Positive Performance of Power-Sharing Arrangements

Negotiations, Continued: Ensuring the Positive Performance of Power-Sharing Arrangements

Thursday, September 12, 2019

By: David Lanz; Laurie Nathan; Alexandre Raffoul

Most negotiated peace settlements since the 1990s have featured some aspect of power sharing, including those in Northern Ireland, Burundi, Bosnia, and Nepal. However, by freezing a sometimes unstable status quo, power sharing can create challenges to maintaining peace over the longer term as issues arise that rekindle enmity or create new suspicions among the parties. This report argues that power-sharing arrangements can be made more durable by providing robust forums, either permanent or ad hoc, that allow parties to resolve differences as they arise and to reaffirm their commitment to peace.

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

Afghan peace talks are damaged, but not yet broken.

Afghan peace talks are damaged, but not yet broken.

Tuesday, September 10, 2019

By: USIP Staff; Andrew Wilder

President Trump’s weekend announcement of a halt to U.S. peace talks with Afghanistan’s Taliban—including a previously unannounced U.S. plan for a Camp David meeting to conclude that process—leaves the future of the Afghanistan peace process unclear. USIP’s Andrew Wilder, a longtime Afghanistan analyst, argues that, rather than declaring an end to the peace process, U.S. negotiators could use the setback as a moment to clarify the strategy, and then urgently get the peace process back on track before too much momentum is lost.

Peace Processes

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