Agreement between the Government of the Federal Democratic Republic of Ethiopia and the Goverment of the State of Eritrea
(12-12-2000)
Posted by USIP Library on: December 13, 2000
Source Name: The Embassy of Ethiopia, Washington, D.C. for text of the agreement and date and signature authentication.
Date faxed: December 12, 2000

Additional Documents

Statement of U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine K. Albright
(12-12-2000)
Posted by USIP Library on: December 13, 2000
Source Name: Web site of the U.S. Department of State, Secretary of State
Date URL: secretary.state.gov/www/statements/2000/001212.html
Date Downloaded: December 13, 2000

Statement of U. N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan
(12-12-2000)
Posted by USIP Library on: December 13, 2000
Source Name: Web site of the United Nations, Statements of the Secretary-General
Source URL: srch0.un.org:80/plweb-cgi/fastweb?state_id=976724298&view=presssg&docrank=3&numhitsfound=7&query_rule=%28%28%28$query1%29%29%3Asymbol%29%20AND%20%28%23date%28$query3%29%3C%3DDATE%3C%3D%23date%28$query4%29%29&query1=SG%2F%2A&query3=12-10-2000&docid=2334&docdb=pr2000&dbname=press&sorting=BYFIELD%3A-DATE&TemplateName=predoc.tmpl&setCookie=1
Date Downloaded: December 13, 2000

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