When I started to examine the impact of information technology on international relations a few years ago, I was initially attracted to the topic because there was not a lot of conventional wisdom on it. Compared to NATO enlargement, peacekeeping or ethnic conflict, this was a very new topic.

Introduction

When I started to examine the impact of information technology on international relations a few years ago, I was initially attracted to the topic because there was not a lot of conventional wisdom on it. Compared to NATO enlargement, peacekeeping or ethnic conflict, this was a very new topic.

It turned out that the ability of a post-industrial society to generate conventional wisdom, however, is great. Despite the fact that it is a new topic, there actually is quite a lot of conventional wisdom. In fact, there is probably a corollary to Moore's Law on the growth of processing power, that is, the stock of conventional wisdom about information technology doubles roughly every 18 months or so. Even so, a lot of the conventional wisdom is self-contradictory, inconsistent or rapidly changing.

About the Author

Frank Fukuyama
Transcript of a presentation at the 1997 Virtual Diplomacy Conference
April 1, 1997

Related Publications

Afghanistan Post-2014

Afghanistan Post-2014

Thursday, November 12, 2015

By: David Mansfield

Geospatial analysis and mapping have a critical role to play in reconstruction efforts in conflict-affected regions. This report explains the core problem in typical data collection techniques: bias. Data is collected only where collection is safe and thus is not representative. To be more effective, development programs need more in-depth analysis of their reconstruction efforts, even in the most insecure spaces.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

View All Publications