The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) ran the Sudanese & South Sudanese Youth Leaders program from 2013-2019. The program brought Sudanese and South Sudanese peacebuilders between ages 18 and 35 to Washington, DC to be in residence at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) for four months. The goal of the project was to support youth to gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to further their peacebuilding work and position themselves as stronger peacebuilding agents in their communities. Today, USIP’s youth leaders are engaged in peacebuilding efforts back in their communities. Their projects and work have focused on engaging young female peacebuilders, religious peacebuilding, the role of women in conflict and peace, the role of media in peacebuilding, and analyses of the root causes of local conflict.

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Past Youth Leaders

Nyachangkuoth R. Tai

Namisio Joy Bage

Francis Banychieng Jor
Project: Promotion of Gender Equality and Inclusiveness

Ajing Chol Giir, South Sudan
Project: The role of “Sports and Cultural Dialogue” in peacebuilding and reconciliation

Silvio William Deng, South Sudan
Project: Root Causes of Ethnic Conflict in Upper Nile State

Ikhlas Mohammed, Sudan
Project: Women’s Role in Conflict Resolution in Darfur

Arif Omer, Sudan 
Project: The Peace Lens Project (Media and Conflict in Sudan)

Othow Okoti Onger, South Sudan 
Project: The Role of the Church in Peacebuilding in Jonglei State

Related Publications

An African Activist Builds Peace with Youth—and Refugees

An African Activist Builds Peace with Youth—and Refugees

Thursday, June 11, 2020

By: James Rupert

Gatwal Gatkuoth was about 11 years old when war in Sudan forced him to flee hundreds of miles, alone, to Uganda as a refugee. Now he works to end wars. When COVID struck Uganda, the nation’s sudden shutdown caught Gatkuoth touring remote refugee camps, seeking ways to help Africa’s largest refugee population survive the pandemic. So when the U.N. Security Council called him weeks ago to ask his advice on improving efforts to build peace, Gatkuoth’s briefing over an unstable cellphone line came straight from a fragile front line of human need.

Type: Blog

Global Health; Youth

COVID-19 and Conflict: Horn of Africa

COVID-19 and Conflict: Horn of Africa

Thursday, April 30, 2020

By: Susan Stigant

USIP is closely following the effects of the novel coronavirus around the world and we’re particularly concerned about its effects in fragile states and conflict zones, which are especially vulnerable to the impacts of these kinds of outbreaks. This week, our Susan Stigant looks at what new challenges have emerged in the Horn of Africa since the outbreak began.

Type: Blog

Global Health

South Sudan’s Transition: Citizens’ Perception of Peace

South Sudan’s Transition: Citizens’ Perception of Peace

Thursday, March 19, 2020

By: Jan Pospisil; Oringa Christopher; Sophia Dawkins; David Deng

Last month’s breakthrough between South Sudan’s government and its armed opposition on establishing a new transitional government represents a critical step toward ending the country’s civil war, a conflict that over the past six years has killed more than 400,000 people and displaced a third of the nation’s population of 12 million.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Peace Processes

South Sudan: Hope for the Best, Plan for the Worst

South Sudan: Hope for the Best, Plan for the Worst

Monday, October 7, 2019

By: David Deng; Aly Verjee

With little more than a month left before a new transitional government is set to assume power in South Sudan, efforts to keep the latest peace agreement on track are becoming more urgent, even as most key pre-transition deadlines have been missed and the political will of the belligerents remains in doubt. Given these circumstances, efforts to support the current process remain vitally necessary and thorough planning for the worst-case scenarios is also desperately needed in case South Sudan’s fragile peace collapses.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

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