The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) launched its Sudanese & South Sudanese Youth Leaders program in 2013. The program brings Sudanese and South Sudanese peacebuilders between ages 18 and 35 to Washington, DC to be in residence at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) for four months. The goal of the project is to support youth to gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to further their peacebuilding work and position themselves as stronger peacebuilding agents in their communities. USIP will bring one Sudanese and one South Sudanese leader in the spring of 2016 and another two leaders in the fall of 2016.

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Previous youth leaders have done projects related to religious peacebuilding, the role of women in conflict and peace, and the role of media in peacebuilding, analyses of the roots of local conflict. Youth leaders spend the majority of their fellowships doing individual research, attending meetings with USIP staff, and participating in events in the D.C. area.

Current Youth Leaders

Jor

Francis Banychieng Jor is a 2017 Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). During his time at the Institute, Francis will work on a self-led research project on “the Promotion of Gender Equality and Inclusiveness” in the context of South Sudan. He strongly believes in empowering young men and women to play critical roles and actively participate in peacebuilding efforts. Mr. Jor holds a Bachelor’s degree in education, specializing in English and Literature from the University of Bahr el Ghazal, Sudan. He fluently speaks Nuer, Arabic and English.

 

ajing

Ajing Chol Giir is a 2017 South Sudanese Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). Ajing is working on a self-led research project to explore the role of “Sports and Cultural Dialogue” in peacebuilding and reconciliation in the context of South Sudan. Mr. Giir holds a diploma in business administration from Dima college in Nairobi, Kenya. He fluently speaks Dinka, English, Kiswahili and Arabic.

 

 

The application for the 2016 youth leaders program is now closed. 

For future iterations of the Sudanese and South Sudanese Youth Leaders Program, please find instructions below.

Please read the application instructions before starting your application. USIP will consider both internet-based and Word-based application submissions, but prefers internet-based applications when possible. The internet-based version of the application can be found here and the Word version of the application can be accessed here. Please only submit one application.

For program and eligibility requirements, please refer to the application instructions.

2015/2016 Application and Program Timeline

December 4, 2015 - Application opens
January 1, 2016 - Application deadline; no submissions will be accepted after 12:00 noon EST
January 15, 2016 - Semi-finalists notified via email by 17:00 (5:00pm) EST
January 18 - 25, 2016 - Semi-finalists interviewed by phone
January 29, 2016 - Finalists notified
April 1, 2016 - Spring cohort of youth leaders arrive in Washington, D.C.
July 1, 2016 - Fall cohort of youth leaders arrive in Washington, D.C.
August 8, 2016 - Spring cohort of youth leaders return home
November 10, 2016 - Fall cohort of youth leaders return home

Past Youth Leaders

Silvio William Deng, South Sudan
Project: Root Causes of Ethnic Conflict in Upper Nile State

Ikhlas Mohammed, Sudan
Project: Women’s Role in Conflict Resolution in Darfur

Arif Omer, Sudan 
Project: The Peace Lens Project (Media and Conflict in Sudan)

Othow Okoti Onger, South Sudan 
Project: The Role of the Church in Peacebuilding in Jonglei State

Related Publications

Will the Latest Deal Bring Peace in South Sudan?

Will the Latest Deal Bring Peace in South Sudan?

Monday, August 20, 2018

By: Aly Verjee; Payton Knopf

On August 5, the warring parties in South Sudan signed an agreement which calls for the formation of another power-sharing government. The previous power-sharing government collapsed in July 2016, and the war has since spread throughout the country. USIP’s Aly Verjee and Payton Knopf discuss the developments that led to the deal, identify the agreement’s risks and deficiencies, and assess future prospects for the peace process.

Peace Processes

Susan Stigant on South Sudan

Susan Stigant on South Sudan

Thursday, June 28, 2018

By: Susan Stigant

Can South Sudan—the world’s youngest country—find peace? USIP’s Susan Stigant discusses the country’s political crisis and how its exacerbated by the outgrowth of opposition groups, millions of displaced citizens, and other complex challenges to restoring stability. Nevertheless, Stigant explains that peace is possible with U.S. leadership.

Democracy & Governance

Strong Words Alone will not Deliver Peace to South Sudan

Strong Words Alone will not Deliver Peace to South Sudan

Thursday, June 7, 2018

By: Aly Verjee

At the end of May, after only four days, South Sudan’s long-delayed peace talks once again adjourned without reaching a viable agreement. The failure to reach a deal comes only weeks after the White House declared that the Government of South Sudan had “lost credibility,” expressed deep frustration at the “lack of progress toward an agreement,” and warned that “more than seven million people will face life-threatening hunger in the coming months,” as a result of the crisis.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

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