Sawa Shabab (Together Youth) series is produced locally by Free Voice South Sudan in collaboration with USIP, to promote peace and stability by empowering youth to be confident, open-minded and participatory citizens in a diverse society.

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The drama series follows the daily lives of different young South Sudanese as they face unique challenges while learning how to become peacebuilders in their communities.  Sawa Shabab consists of 20 episodes in  English and Arabic and five episodes in Nuer and Dinka languages and will be aired on Radio Miraya, the Catholic Radio Network and other local stations across the country.

Featured Episode

Episode 14

Family tensions come to a head in this episode. After Ms. Mary bans the student union from wearing traditional jewelry, ChoCho encourages Winnie not to give up. Taban and ChoCho travel to see Taban’s father in the village, but the visit is not what he thought it would be. Richard and his father get into a fight and he learns from he only received his promotion because of his family connections.

English

Arabic

 

About the Peacebuilding Curriculum

The dramatic series is based on an educational, peacebuilding curriculum designed with local partners. The curriculum seeks to increase knowledge and change the attitudes and behaviors of youth listeners regarding their roles in building peace in South Sudan. The series' curriculum focuses on three main goals, identified by local experts as critical to building peace in South Sudan.

The series’ curriculum focuses on three main areas, identified by local experts as critical to building peace in South Sudan.

  • Co-Existence and National Identity – To promote peaceful co-existence and mutual respect among South Sudanese youth from different cultural and tribal orientations.
  • Youth Empowerment and Personal Responsibility - To create the foundations of peacebuilding by empowering South Sudanese youth to be accountable, independent and participatory citizens of society.
  • Gender – To promote peaceful and democratic growth in society by fostering an understanding of gender equality. 

Interact with Sawa Shabab

Young South Sudanese inside and outside of the country are encouraged to engage with the Sawa Shabab program. Youth can share their thoughts and experiences online through the Sawa Shabab Facebook fan page as well as via Twitter (@SawaShabab).

The program also includes opportunities for young listeners in South Sudan to interact with the drama through text messages and phone call-ins. Listeners will be invited to respond to questions raised within the episode and send thoughts and feedback on characters and storylines.

Listen to the Series Theme Song

 

 

Related Publications

Reforming the U.S.-Sudan Relationship Requires a Regional Strategy

Reforming the U.S.-Sudan Relationship Requires a Regional Strategy

Wednesday, December 19, 2018

By: Aly Verjee; Payton Knopf

On November 7, the U.S. Department of State announced long-awaited plans outlining a path to better relations with Sudan, “designed to expand our bilateral cooperation, facilitate meaningful reforms to enhance stability in Sudan, and achieve further progress in a number of areas of longstanding concern.” USIP’s Aly Verjee and Payton Knopf discuss the initiative, and identify where broader U.S. regional objectives could cohere, including in the war in Yemen.

Fragility & Resilience; Global Policy

Why the U.S. Needs a Special Envoy for the Red Sea

Why the U.S. Needs a Special Envoy for the Red Sea

Tuesday, October 23, 2018

By: Payton Knopf

The Trump administration has appointed four special envoys to coordinate U.S. policy toward key hot spots: Iran, North Korea, Syria, and Afghanistan. Yet in the Red Sea—one of the most volatile and lethal regions of the world afflicted by several interconnected conflicts and rivalries that pose significant challenges to American interests—U.S. policy has been rudderless in large part due to the absence of a similar post.

Global Policy; Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Sudan after Sanctions

Sudan after Sanctions

Thursday, May 31, 2018

By: Aly Verjee

In October 2017, the United States lifted a wide range of economic sanctions that had been in place against Sudan for two decades. Aly Verjee, a visiting expert at the United States Institute of Peace, recently interviewed roughly 50 Sudanese—including students, business owners, doctors, laborers, activists, and others outside the government-connected elite—on what this first step in the normalization of relations between Sudan and the United States might mean for the future of their country.

Economics & Environment; Global Policy; Violent Extremism

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