Zach Vertin served as director of policy in the Office of the U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan from 2013-2016. He was involved in the South Sudan peace process from its inception, providing political, technical and strategic input to the IGAD mediators and engaging the parties to the negotiations on behalf of the United States. The United States was an important peace process supporter throughout the negotiations, offering diplomatic and financial support at the request of the mediation and the IGAD Heads of State.

Vertin was previously a senior analyst at the International Crisis Group, first on multilateral affairs in New York and later in Sudan and South Sudan. His 2019 book, "A Rope from the Sky: The Making and Unmaking of the World's Newest State," chronicles the birth of South Sudan, its civil war and the peacemaking effort. Vertin was later a Fellow at the Brookings Institution and the Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, and taught a regular graduate course at Princeton University on international mediation, negotiation and peace processes. He currently serves in the Biden administration as senior advisor to the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations.

Publications By Zach

The South Sudan Peace Process Archive: A Window into Mediation

The South Sudan Peace Process Archive: A Window into Mediation

Monday, March 29, 2021

By: Zach Vertin; Aly Verjee

As part of its commitment to learning from peace processes, the U.S. Institute of Peace is pleased to launch the South Sudan Peace Process Archive, which aims to provide South Sudanese citizens, mediators, policymakers, academics and other interested readers a window into the 2013-2015 negotiations that attempted to end the conflict that began in South Sudan in late 2013. Documents for this archive were first assembled and organized in 2016. Now, archive curators and former peace process advisers Zach Vertin and Aly Verjee discuss their motivations for assembling and organizing the documents and what they hope the archive can contribute to future peace processes.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

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