Rosie Levine is a senior program analyst working on the China program at the United States Institute of Peace. She joined USIP after four years at the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, a New York City-based non-profit. In this role, Levine was responsible for the Public Intellectuals Program where she designed and implemented programs for a network of leading China scholars to improve American understanding of China. She also oversaw a year-long project to survey and report on the state of American research on China. The findings from the project received mention in The Guardian, The Atlantic, The Financial Times and a dedicated episode of the Sinica podcast. 

Levine lived in Beijing, China from 2014 to 2018 where she completed her master's degree in Chinese studies at the Yenching Academy of Peking University and worked in the non-profit sector. She received her bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and graduated with highest honors. Levine grew up in China, spending ages four to nine in Beijing.

Publications By Rosie

Biden and Xi at APEC: Averting Further Crisis in U.S.-China Relations

Biden and Xi at APEC: Averting Further Crisis in U.S.-China Relations

Thursday, November 16, 2023

By: Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Rosie Levine;  Ryan Sung;  Lyndi Tsering

President Joe Biden and Chinese leader Xi Jinping spoke for several hours on the sidelines of the Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC) Summit this week in San Francisco. After several years of deteriorating relations — and frozen communication — between Washington and Beijing, Biden characterized the talks as the “most constructive and productive” since he came to office. But the increasing strategic competition between the two powers leaves major issues still to be addressed, such as China’s aggression in the South China Sea and Taiwan Strait, BRICS expansion, nuclear security, and the wars in Ukraine and the Middle East.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

What You Need to Know About Taiwan’s Pivotal Presidential Elections

What You Need to Know About Taiwan’s Pivotal Presidential Elections

Wednesday, November 8, 2023

By: Kemi Adewalure;  Rosie Levine;  Jennifer Staats, Ph.D.;  Alex Stephenson

Ahead of the November 20 deadline to register candidates, Taiwan’s campaign season for the January 2024 presidential elections is in full swing and voters are presented with four candidates. While economic and energy policies will be key for voters, the chief foreign policy issue is how to manage relations with China. Both Beijing and Washington will be watching closely for what the election augurs for cross-Strait tension and Taiwan’s relationships with the world’s two major powers.

Type: Analysis

Democracy & GovernanceGlobal Policy

What Does Qin Gang’s Removal Mean for China’s Foreign Policy?

What Does Qin Gang’s Removal Mean for China’s Foreign Policy?

Thursday, July 27, 2023

By: Rosie Levine;  Andrew Scobell, Ph.D.;  Adam Gallagher

Speculation has run rampant the last month over the whereabouts of China’s foreign minister, Qin Gang. Rumors ranged from the salacious (he had an affair) to the mundane, while the official line states that he is dealing with health problems. On Tuesday, China officially replaced Qin with his predecessor, Wang Yi, who leads the Chinese Communist Party’s (CCP) foreign policy apparatus. Qin’s removal from office, and the erasure of references to him and his activities on official Chinese government websites, have only furthered interest into what happened. Beyond the political intrigue, the more substantive question is what this means for China’s diplomacy.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

View All