Rosie Levine is a senior program analyst working on the China program at the United States Institute of Peace. She joined USIP after four years at the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations, a New York City-based non-profit. In this role, Levine was responsible for the Public Intellectuals Program where she designed and implemented programs for a network of leading China scholars to improve American understanding of China. She also oversaw a year-long project to survey and report on the state of American research on China. The findings from the project received mention in The Guardian, The Atlantic, The Financial Times and a dedicated episode of the Sinica podcast. 

Levine lived in Beijing, China from 2014 to 2018 where she completed her master's degree in Chinese studies at the Yenching Academy of Peking University and worked in the non-profit sector. She received her bachelor’s degree in history from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor and graduated with highest honors. Levine grew up in China, spending ages four to nine in Beijing.

Publications By Rosie

Three Takeaways on U.S.-China Relations After the Shangri-La Summit

Three Takeaways on U.S.-China Relations After the Shangri-La Summit

Wednesday, June 7, 2023

By: Rosie Levine;  Alex Stephenson

Defense ministers from around the world gathered in Singapore last weekend for the annual Shangri-La Dialogue, a forum for discussing security challenges in Asia and an opportunity for high-ranking security officials to engage in bilateral talks. However, U.S. Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin did not meet with his Chinese counterpart, Li Shangfu. Beijing suspended formal military-to-military meetings last August following then-Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan. Since then, U.S.-China tensions have only ratcheted up, particularly following revelations this February that a Chinese surveillance balloon was hovering over U.S. territory.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global PolicyMediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Tensions over Taiwan Rise with Tsai’s U.S. Stopover

Tensions over Taiwan Rise with Tsai’s U.S. Stopover

Thursday, March 30, 2023

By: Rosie Levine;  Jennifer Staats, Ph.D.

President Tsai Ing-wen of Taiwan transits this week through the United States, stopping in New York on her way to Guatemala and Belize, and in California on her way home. Tsai has made six stopovers since she took office in 2016, but this is the first since July 2019. The stopovers are not official visits, but Tsai is expected to meet Speaker of the House Kevin McCarthy in California. Beijing has made it known it fiercely opposes the stopover and threatened to retaliate if McCarthy and Tsai meet.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

After Beijing’s Balloon, What’s Next for U.S.-China Ties?

After Beijing’s Balloon, What’s Next for U.S.-China Ties?

Thursday, February 9, 2023

By: Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Rosie Levine

Days before U.S. Secretary of State Antony Blinken was set to travel to Beijing, the Pentagon announced it had detected a Chinese “surveillance balloon” over Montana. The incident sparked intense speculation about China’s intentions, including why it would choose to employ a relatively low-tech surveillance device. Ultimately, Blinken announced on February 3 that he was postponing his trip, which would have been the first by a U.S. secretary of state in five years. With U.S.-China tensions already simmering, the balloon episode injects more mistrust and scuttled the opportunity presented by Blinken’s trip to resume cooperation on areas of mutual interest and demonstrate that both sides want to better manage bilateral tensions.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

Three Key Takeaways from the Biden-Xi Summit

Three Key Takeaways from the Biden-Xi Summit

Thursday, November 17, 2022

By: Rosie Levine;  Jennifer Staats, Ph.D.;  Alex Stephenson

With the U.S.-China relationship at its lowest point in decades, the American and Chinese leaders met this week on the sidelines of the G-20 summit in Indonesia for their first face-to-face summit since Joe Biden was elected. The deteriorating bilateral relationship became particularly concerning in August when China cut key lines of communication between Washington and Beijing, including on critical military and climate issues, following House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s visit to Taiwan.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

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