The U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) launched its Sudanese & South Sudanese Youth Leaders program in 2013. The program brings Sudanese and South Sudanese peacebuilders between ages 18 and 35 to Washington, DC to be in residence at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP) for four months. The goal of the project is to support youth to gain the knowledge, skills, and confidence to further their peacebuilding work and position themselves as stronger peacebuilding agents in their communities. USIP will bring one Sudanese and one South Sudanese leader in the spring of 2016 and another two leaders in the fall of 2016.

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Previous youth leaders have done projects related to religious peacebuilding, the role of women in conflict and peace, and the role of media in peacebuilding, analyses of the roots of local conflict. Youth leaders spend the majority of their fellowships doing individual research, attending meetings with USIP staff, and participating in events in the D.C. area.

Current Youth Leaders

Jor

Francis Banychieng Jor is a 2017 Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). During his time at the Institute, Francis will work on a self-led research project on “the Promotion of Gender Equality and Inclusiveness” in the context of South Sudan. He strongly believes in empowering young men and women to play critical roles and actively participate in peacebuilding efforts. Mr. Jor holds a Bachelor’s degree in education, specializing in English and Literature from the University of Bahr el Ghazal, Sudan. He fluently speaks Nuer, Arabic and English.

 

ajing

Ajing Chol Giir is a 2017 South Sudanese Youth Leader in the Sudan and South Sudan Youth Leaders program at the U.S. Institute of Peace (USIP). Ajing is working on a self-led research project to explore the role of “Sports and Cultural Dialogue” in peacebuilding and reconciliation in the context of South Sudan. Mr. Giir holds a diploma in business administration from Dima college in Nairobi, Kenya. He fluently speaks Dinka, English, Kiswahili and Arabic.

 

 

The application for the 2016 youth leaders program is now closed. 

For future iterations of the Sudanese and South Sudanese Youth Leaders Program, please find instructions below.

Please read the application instructions before starting your application. USIP will consider both internet-based and Word-based application submissions, but prefers internet-based applications when possible. The internet-based version of the application can be found here and the Word version of the application can be accessed here. Please only submit one application.

For program and eligibility requirements, please refer to the application instructions.

2015/2016 Application and Program Timeline

December 4, 2015 - Application opens
January 1, 2016 - Application deadline; no submissions will be accepted after 12:00 noon EST
January 15, 2016 - Semi-finalists notified via email by 17:00 (5:00pm) EST
January 18 - 25, 2016 - Semi-finalists interviewed by phone
January 29, 2016 - Finalists notified
April 1, 2016 - Spring cohort of youth leaders arrive in Washington, D.C.
July 1, 2016 - Fall cohort of youth leaders arrive in Washington, D.C.
August 8, 2016 - Spring cohort of youth leaders return home
November 10, 2016 - Fall cohort of youth leaders return home

Past Youth Leaders

Silvio William Deng, South Sudan
Project: Root Causes of Ethnic Conflict in Upper Nile State

Ikhlas Mohammed, Sudan
Project: Women’s Role in Conflict Resolution in Darfur

Arif Omer, Sudan 
Project: The Peace Lens Project (Media and Conflict in Sudan)

Othow Okoti Onger, South Sudan 
Project: The Role of the Church in Peacebuilding in Jonglei State

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