The International Network to Promote the Rule of Law (INPROL) is an online community of practice that promotes coordination and collaboration in the rule of law field through research, innovation and support to experts and institutions operating in post-conflict and developing countries. Learn more about INPROL and apply for membership through the Network’s website.

women afghanistan voting
Photo Courtesy of the New York Times

INPROL's Partner Organizations and Advisory Council

INPROL is spearheaded by the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement; the Center of Excellence for Police Stability Units; the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe’s Strategic Police Matters Unit; and William & Mary School of Law. INPROL also has a number of affiliated organizations and research institutions.

It's Honorary Board and Council of Experts are comprised of eminent rule of law practitioners that have served in various U.N. field missions, international organizations or are recognized leaders of rule of law efforts around the world.

INPROL's Goals and Website Features

The International Network to Promote Rule of Law aims to:

  • Help Rule of Law practitioners and academics solve the problems they face in the field, and promote professional development and learning: Rule of law actors deepen their rule of law knowledge and skills through INPROL by:
    • Accessing an extensive repository of over 2,100 rule of law resources in its Online Digital Library;
    • Receiving advice and input from their INPROL peers by posting a question on the Online Discussion Forums;
    • Accessing INPROL's knowledge products and applied research, such as its Research Memoranda that are drafted in response to queries posted on the Online Forums, or its Practitioners Guides, a publication series that distills best practices and approaches in key rule of law areas;
    • Keeping up on the latest developments in the field through the News and Features section, with blogs and short articles on current and emerging rule of law issues; and
    • Look for future employment opportunities on the Jobs page
  • Promote Coordination in the Rule of Law Field: INPROL fosters coordination within the community, helping to develop networks and synergies across regions, organizations and disciplines; and,
  • Foster Innovation in the Rule of Law Field: INPROL supports advances in the field and the development of cutting-edge practices by facilitating dynamic dialogues through its online Rule of Law Dialogue Space, where practitioners come together to problem-solve around key rule of law issues. 

Work in Afghanistan

INPROL developed an in-depth, informative Afghanistan country page and digital library to support rule of law practitioners and academics in the country, and to provide all INPROL members with an overview of rule of law in Afghanistan. INPROL is also developing a series of research memorandum and webinars to support the rule of law community in Afghanistan.

Membership

INPROL's members are experienced international rule of law practitioners and academics. The network is open to those currently working on rule of law reforms in a post-conflict or developing country in a policy-, practice-, or research role. Applicants may apply online.

Related Publications

In Casamance, Dialogue Helps Battle Coronavirus and Build Trust

In Casamance, Dialogue Helps Battle Coronavirus and Build Trust

Tuesday, June 9, 2020

By: Anthony Navone; Adam Gallagher

The Casamance region of Senegal has been wracked by conflict since 1982, when an insurgency sought independence over social and cultural grievances with the Senegalese government. Nearly four decades later, the unresolved conflict has frayed the relationship between security forces and Casamance’s citizens, disintegrating the trust that once existed. But, this March, as the coronavirus was spreading around the globe, dialogues between youth leaders, security forces, civilian authorities, and other local stakeholders in the town of Goudomp helped to rebuild ties between security forces and the community and foster cooperation to combat COVID-19.

Type: Blog

Global Health; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Illicit Drug Trafficking and Use in Libya: Highs and Lows

Illicit Drug Trafficking and Use in Libya: Highs and Lows

Thursday, May 28, 2020

By: Fiona Mangan

This report explores how illicit drug trafficking and drug use in Libya has shaped and been shaped by the country’s ongoing conflict. Drawing on hundreds of interviews and dedicated research, it examines Libya’s pre-2011 illicit economy, delves into the social impact of drugs, and focuses on drug use on the frontlines of Libya’s ongoing conflict, the corrosive impact of drug trafficking and use on the justice and security sector, and how trafficking and organized crime undercut peacebuilding and state consolidation.

Type: Peaceworks

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

How to Put Human Security at the Center of the Response to Coronavirus

How to Put Human Security at the Center of the Response to Coronavirus

Thursday, April 16, 2020

By: Calin Trenkov-Wermuth, Ph.D.

The coronavirus pandemic will have long-lasting repercussions for governance, justice, and security—among many other things. Many governments are working to contain the outbreak by adopting emergency measures and powers. Security sector actors—police, armed forces, border control authorities, penitentiaries, community security groups, and militias—are now playing a key role in limiting the virus’ spread.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Health; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Managing the Secure Release of Sensitive Detainees in Libya

Managing the Secure Release of Sensitive Detainees in Libya

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

By: Fiona Mangan ; Lillian Dang ; Nate Wilson

During the 2011 uprising that ousted dictator Muammar Gadhafi, revolutionary fighters in Libya rounded up large numbers of Gadhafi loyalists and detained them in prison facilities and makeshift detention centers around the country. The release of such high-profile detainees, either after they have been acquitted of crimes or served their sentences, is a sensitive political issue. This report examines the domestic and international laws and standards governing the secure release of these detainees and provides a number of policy ideas for addressing the shortcomings of Libya’s current release procedures.

Type: Special Report

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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