The International Network to Promote the Rule of Law (INPROL) is an online community of practice that promotes coordination and collaboration in the rule of law field through research, innovation and support to experts and institutions operating in post-conflict and developing countries. Learn more about INPROL and apply for membership through the Network’s website.

women afghanistan voting
Photo Courtesy of the New York Times

INPROL's Partner Organizations and Advisory Council

INPROL is spearheaded by the United States Institute of Peace in partnership with the U.S. Department of State's Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement; the Center of Excellence for Police Stability Units; the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe’s Strategic Police Matters Unit; and William & Mary School of Law. INPROL also has a number of affiliated organizations and research institutions.

It's Honorary Board and Council of Experts are comprised of eminent rule of law practitioners that have served in various U.N. field missions, international organizations or are recognized leaders of rule of law efforts around the world.

INPROL's Goals and Website Features

The International Network to Promote Rule of Law aims to:

  • Help Rule of Law practitioners and academics solve the problems they face in the field, and promote professional development and learning: Rule of law actors deepen their rule of law knowledge and skills through INPROL by:
    • Accessing an extensive repository of over 2,100 rule of law resources in its Online Digital Library;
    • Receiving advice and input from their INPROL peers by posting a question on the Online Discussion Forums;
    • Accessing INPROL's knowledge products and applied research, such as its Research Memoranda that are drafted in response to queries posted on the Online Forums, or its Practitioners Guides, a publication series that distills best practices and approaches in key rule of law areas;
    • Keeping up on the latest developments in the field through the News and Features section, with blogs and short articles on current and emerging rule of law issues; and
    • Look for future employment opportunities on the Jobs page
  • Promote Coordination in the Rule of Law Field: INPROL fosters coordination within the community, helping to develop networks and synergies across regions, organizations and disciplines; and,
  • Foster Innovation in the Rule of Law Field: INPROL supports advances in the field and the development of cutting-edge practices by facilitating dynamic dialogues through its online Rule of Law Dialogue Space, where practitioners come together to problem-solve around key rule of law issues. 

Work in Afghanistan

INPROL developed an in-depth, informative Afghanistan country page and digital library to support rule of law practitioners and academics in the country, and to provide all INPROL members with an overview of rule of law in Afghanistan. INPROL is also developing a series of research memorandum and webinars to support the rule of law community in Afghanistan.

Membership

INPROL's members are experienced international rule of law practitioners and academics. The network is open to those currently working on rule of law reforms in a post-conflict or developing country in a policy-, practice-, or research role. Applicants may apply online.

Related Publications

Managing the Secure Release of Sensitive Detainees in Libya

Managing the Secure Release of Sensitive Detainees in Libya

Tuesday, October 8, 2019

By: Fiona Mangan ; Lillian Dang ; Nate Wilson

During the 2011 uprising that ousted dictator Muammar Gadhafi, revolutionary fighters in Libya rounded up large numbers of Gadhafi loyalists and detained them in prison facilities and makeshift detention centers around the country. The release of such high-profile detainees, either after they have been acquitted of crimes or served their sentences, is a sensitive political issue. This report examines the domestic and international laws and standards governing the secure release of these detainees and provides a number of policy ideas for addressing the shortcomings of Libya’s current release procedures.

Type: Special Report

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Ethiopia’s Experiment in Reconciliation

Ethiopia’s Experiment in Reconciliation

Monday, September 23, 2019

By: Solomon Ayele Dersso

In February 2019, the Ethiopian parliament adopted a landmark proclamation establishing a national reconciliation commission, the first-ever such institution in Ethiopia. Six months on, the commission has developed a three-year plan and begun consultations. But the body was formed without broad-based political consensus regarding its mandate, so has yet to win the critical trust of Ethiopia’s many social and political groups. Dr. Solomon Ayele Dersso discusses the mandate of this body, the challenges ahead, and how the commission could help build peace in Africa’s second most populous country.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Human Rights; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

As Africa Battles Sexual Violence, a Nigerian City Shows How

As Africa Battles Sexual Violence, a Nigerian City Shows How

Thursday, August 8, 2019

By: Isioma Kemakolam

When civic leaders and officials in Jos, Nigeria, launched an initiative in 2017 to calm repeated bloodshed in the city, a series of dialogue forums with residents revealed a chilling pattern of hidden violence in their midst: sexual assault. Girls and women recounted rapes and attacks for which justice was impossible, often because authorities were unresponsive. The women faced a problem common to their sisters across Africa: national laws against sexual violence were having little effect on the ground. But the dialogues have wrought a change. In May, police in Jos opened the city’s first unit dedicated to investigating sexual and gender crimes.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Justice, Security & Rule of Law

Afghanistan Still Has a Chance to Improve This Election

Afghanistan Still Has a Chance to Improve This Election

Monday, August 5, 2019

By: Ezatullah Waqar

As the United States, the Afghan government and the Taliban maneuver toward a peace process for the country, the strength of the current Afghan government and political system will be affected by the credibility, in Afghans’ eyes, of the presidential election set for September 28. Yet the credibility of Afghan elections is weakened by unresolved allegations of criminal fraud—especially against the nation’s former top election officials—in last year’s parliamentary balloting. With just 53 days remaining before the presidential vote, time is now short—but Afghan authorities still can take steps to improve the prospects for an election that citizens might see as credible and legitimate.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance; Justice, Security & Rule of Law

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