Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen is the director of the Israeli-Palestinian conflict program at the U.S. Institute of Peace, where she focuses on the interplay of Israeli and Palestinian civil society and peacebuilding efforts and official diplomacy. She is the co-author and author, respectively, of chapters on Israeli and Palestinian religious peacebuilding efforts for two different USIP publications: Facilitating Dialogue, USIP’s Work in Conflict Zones (2012), and Women, Religion and Peacebuilding: Illuminating the Unseen (2015), and frequently presents in a variety of academic, policy and media forums. She joined USIP in 2010 as a doctoral candidate in Arabic linguistics, and having worked with the U.S. Department of State as a language specialist. Previously, as a program officer at the Kennedy School of Government’s Middle East Initiative, Kurtzer-Ellenbogen managed work on the Israeli, Palestinian, and Saudi Arabian portfolios.

Trained in sociolinguistics and Middle East studies, and proficient in Hebrew and Arabic, her graduate research focused on political and social identity in Arabic discourse, with an emphasis on the Arabic language press of the Arab citizen community in Israel. She holds a bachelor's degree in Arabic and French from Georgetown University, and a master's degree from Georgetown's Arabic department with a dual concentration in linguistics and Arab area studies.

Publications By Lucy

As Vice President Pence Visits the Middle East, Hopes for Diplomacy Languish

As Vice President Pence Visits the Middle East, Hopes for Diplomacy Languish

Friday, January 19, 2018

By: Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen

Vice President Mike Pence heads to Egypt, Jordan and Israel with little diplomatic quiet, and even less hope, on the Israeli-Palestinian front. President Abbas has declared the Oslo peace process dead, and the U.S. mediating role over, President Trump has broken with international consensus on Jerusalem, and pointedly not endorsed a two-state solution since coming to office, and Prime Minister Netanyahu has now hedged on his commitment to the end goal of a Palestinian state.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

What Does President Trump’s Decision on Jerusalem Mean for Israeli-Palestinian Peace?

What Does President Trump’s Decision on Jerusalem Mean for Israeli-Palestinian Peace?

Wednesday, December 6, 2017

By: Lucy Kurtzer-Ellenbogen

Today, President Trump—for the second time while in office—exercised his waiver authority on the 1995 Jerusalem Embassy Act. The law calls for the United States Embassy, currently located in Tel Aviv, to be moved to Jerusalem, in recognition of that city as Israel’s capital. The choice to waive enactment in the name of national security interests hits the president’s desk every six months and, beginning with President Clinton in 1998, has been continuously exercised by each president. But this time was different.

Peace Processes

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