As part of the Institute’s contribution to promoting Iraqi dialogue, USIP’s Sean Kane discusses his new report that concretely imagines what an Iraqi-negotiated solution to the disputed territories might look like.  In addition, Harvard University’s Emma Sky outlines potential on the ground conflict prevention and management mechanisms that could help create the space for Iraqi leaders to continue their search for agreement on these difficult and sensitive issues. 

The status of Kirkuk and other disputed territories is one of the greatest conundrums in Iraqi politics.  With a December deadline looming for the U.S. military drawdown to be completed, no universally accepted political or constitutional framework exists among Iraqis for addressing what some have called the greatest threat to the country’s stability.

As part of the Institute’s contribution to promoting Iraqi dialogue on this important matter, USIP’s Sean Kane discusses his new report entitled “Iraq’s Disputed Territories: A View of the Political Horizon and Implications for U.S. Policy,” which concretely imagines what an Iraqi-negotiated solution to the disputed territories might look like.  In addition, Harvard University’s Emma Sky outlines potential on-the-ground conflict prevention and management mechanisms that could help create the space for Iraqi leaders to continue their search for agreement on these difficult and sensitive issues. These are further described in her recently published Peace Brief, "Preventing Arab-Kurd Conflict in Iraq after the Withdrawal of U.S. Forces."

The speakers are joined by senior Iraqi respondents and Joost Hiltermann of the International Crisis Group, who provides a critical look at the ideas and options proposed.

Speakers

  • Sean Kane
    Program Officer, Iraq Programs
    U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Emma Sky
    Resident Fellow, Harvard University
    Former Political Advisor to the Commanding General, U.S. Forces-Iraq
    Former CPA Governorate Coordinator - Kirkuk
  • Dr. Joost Hiltermann, Respondent
    Deputy Program Director, Middle East and North Africa
    International Crisis Group
  • William Taylor, Moderator
    Senior Vice President, Center for Conflict Management
    U.S. Institute of Peace

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