On May 20, 2011, USIP hosted a panel discussion with the Asia Society to launch the Pakistan 2020 Study Group Report, "Pakistan 2020: A Vision for Building a Better Future."


In recent years, Pakistan has stumbled from one crisis to another. Insurgencies along its northwestern borders, regular terrorist attacks across the country, continued tensions with India, and the ongoing war in neighboring Afghanistan have all contributed to deepened instability in the country. Pakistan's transition from a near-decade long rule under a military dictatorship is slow and complicated as corruption and incompetence of the bureaucracy present huge obstacles to progress and good governance.

In parallel, Pakistan's return to democracy, increasingly active civil society, relatively open media, and the rise of an independent higher judiciary provide glimmers of hope, though poor economic and development indicators coupled with worrying demographic trends continue to pose serious challenges to the well-being of millions of Pakistanis. Energy shortages have worsened in recent years, and the destruction caused by the floods of 2010 has exacerbated the country's many strains. In short, how Pakistan manages these challenges in the coming years holds great consequences for its future prospects.

On May 20, 2011, USIP and the Asia Society hosted the launch of a new report, Pakistan 2020: A Vision for Building a Better Future, which presents recommendations focused on seven areas essential to realizing a sound future for the country by 2020: (1) strengthening democratic institutions; (2) supporting the rule of law; (3) improving human development and social services, especially in health and education; (4) developing the energy infrastructure; (5) assisting the 2010 flood victims in their recovery; (6) improving the internal security situation; and (7) advancing the peace process with India. Join members of the Study Group as they discuss how Pakistan can forge a path toward peace and stability in the coming decade.

Speakers

  • Najam Sethi
    Editor-in-Chief
    The Friday Times & Dunya TV
  • Hassan Abbas
    Bernard Schwartz Fellow and Project Director
    Asia Society
  • Christopher Candland
    Associate Professor of Political Science and Co-Director, South Asia Studies Program
    Wellesley College
  • Moeed Yusuf, moderator
    South Asia Adviser
    U.S. Institute of Peace

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