USIP and Sudanese experts discussed key questions surrounding a national dialogue process in Sudan in an online-only event. 

Sudan_Dialogue

Sudan faces a daunting mix of political, economic and security challenges, all of which are likely to intensify as elections -- scheduled for 2015 -- grow near and President Bashir’s term concludes. The potential shift creates opportunities for new political arrangements, possibly including drafting a new constitution. There's also an imperative to end the conflicts in Sudan's west and south.

Ongoing discussions about how to make progress includes approaches such as national dialogues. These can be part of a broader political reform process that involves all groups, and addresses governance, diversity and reconciliation. Ambassador Princeton Lyman and Jon Temin discussed pathways to a national dialogue in a PeaceBrief last fall.

Thank you to those who were able to join the United States Institute of Peace for an online-only discussion (#SudanDialogue) of key questions surrounding a national dialogue process and the potential benefits such an approach might achieve in Sudan. The webcast of the event is below.

Panelists

Ambassador Princeton Lyman
Special Advisor to the President
United States Institute of Peace

Nasredeen Abdulbari
Lecturer of International and Comparative Law University of Khartoum

Ahmed Hussain Adam
Visiting Scholar and co-chair of the Two Sudans Project Columbia University in New York City

Magdeldin (Magdi) Elgizouli
German Academic Exchange Service Scholar
University of Freiburg, Germany

Dr. Abdullahi Ibrahim
Associate Professor
University of Missouri

Mr. Sayed Elkhatib
Director, Centre for Strategic Studies

Jon Temin
Director of Africa Programs
United States Institute of Peace

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