Image on right: An election banner in the Spring 2000 Iranian elections reads: "Obtaining Women's Rights, Freedom of Thought, and Social Justice." (Photo by Jon B. Alterman. Translation courtesy of Jon B. Alterman and Bernard Lynch.)

A joint symposium co-sponsored by the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Center for the Study of Islam & Democracy, a special panel of experts examined the following issues:

  • The compatibility of Islam with democratic principles;
  • Human rights and Islam;
  • What the U.S. can do to promote democracy in the Muslim world; and
  • Problems confronted by democratic movements in the Muslim world.

Co-Chaired by Religion & Peacemaking Initiative Director David Smock and Executive Director for the Center for the Study of Islam & Democracy Radwan Masmoudi, the presentation was webcast live on June 18 and included questions from the floor and the Internet audience.

Speakers

  • Muqtedar Khan
    Adrian College
  • Mahmood Monshipouri
    Quinnipiac University
  • Neil Hicks
    Lawyer's Committee for Human Rights and Former Institute Senior Fellow
  • Laith Kubba
    National Endowment for Democracy

Moderators

  • Radwan Masmoudi
    Executive Director, Center for the Study of Islam & Democracy
  • David Smock
    Director, Religion & Peacemaking Initiative, U.S. Institute of Peace

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