At least 3,000 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are operating in Haiti. Struggling with insufficient capacity in the face of overwhelming poverty and environmental disasters, the government has been unable to coordinate or capitalize on what some in Haiti refer to as a “Republic of NGOs."

At least 3,000 non-governmental organizations (NGOs) are operating in Haiti. Struggling with insufficient capacity in the face of overwhelming poverty and environmental disasters, the government has been unable to coordinate or capitalize on what some in Haiti refer to as a “Republic of NGOs."

However, in April, Haitian officials and international donors touted a new paradigm of economic development in Haiti: rather than funding aid through foreign NGOs, donors looked to the Haitian government to determine priorities and plans and pledged to channel more aid through the public sector.  Does this truly mark a paradigm shift for Haiti?  What does this apparent shift mean for NGOs and development firms working in Haiti?  What is the role of NGOs in this new aid arena? A panel of experts will discussed this topic from their various perspectives.

Speakers

  • John Chromy
    Vice President, CHF International
  • Rob Dressen
    Senior Vice President, DAI
  • Donna Barry
    Advocacy and Policy Director, Partners in Health
  • François Pierre-Louis
    Associate Professor, Queens College
  • Robert Maguire, Moderator
    Associate Professor, Trinity Washington University

Explore Further

Related Publications

A Plan for Haiti’s Growing Fragility: U.N. Action That’s Equal to the Challenge

A Plan for Haiti’s Growing Fragility: U.N. Action That’s Equal to the Challenge

Thursday, September 30, 2021

By: Nicolas Devia-Valbuena;  Keith Mines

When throngs of Haitian migrants rushed the U.S. border recently, it was only the latest manifestation of a society battered by trauma. In just the previous two months, Haiti had seen the murky assassination of its president, devastating floods and an earthquake that killed thousands and wiped out nearly 140,000 homes. As fragile states go, Haiti is in a league all its own. To avoid a repetition of the scene at the border — or one that’s worse throughout the hemisphere — it is time to consider a long-term, robust U.N. mission that matches the scale of the challenge with the size and persistence of the international response. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Fragility & Resilience

Dialogue: Calming Hot Spots Calls for Structure and Skill

Dialogue: Calming Hot Spots Calls for Structure and Skill

Thursday, May 1, 2014

By: Maria Jessop;  Alison Milofsky, Ph.D.

Dialogue has been around as long as humans faced with a crisis have gathered in circles to talk. It is one of the oldest forms of conflict resolution and is still, when well-conceived and executed, one of the most effective. But the familiarity of dialogue can lead to oversimplification or to the perception that it is easier to do successfully than is actually the case.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Mediation, Negotiation & DialogueEducation & Training

View All Publications