Russia’s information operations in Latin American are much deeper and more complex than what is commonly understood. Using a variety of instruments, Moscow has worked to create an environment favorable to Russia and to keep Latin American elites from aligning with Washington on a variety of issues, particularly the war in Ukraine. Douglas Farah, the director of the USIP-funded Russia and Latin America project, explains how Russia deploys information operations in Latin America, what the objective of these efforts is, and what is most concerning about Moscow’s effort to advance its influence in Latin America.

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