Reviving Commercial Development of Afghanistan’s Aynak Copper Resource

Reviving Commercial Development of Afghanistan’s Aynak Copper Resource

Thursday, September 21, 2017

By: William Byrd

While other, smaller mineral resources are being rampantly looted, Afghanistan’s large Aynak copper deposit—worth upward $50 billion—has languished unexploited despite being contracted to a Chinese consortium nearly a decade ago. This Peace Brief seeks to understand what went wrong and explores options for breaking out of the current impasse. Resuscitating the development of Aynak, though challenging, would send a powerful signal of beneficial exploitation of Afghanistan’s mineral resources.

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance

Industrial-Scale Looting of Afghanistan’s Mineral Resources

Industrial-Scale Looting of Afghanistan’s Mineral Resources

Tuesday, May 30, 2017

By: William Byrd; Javed Noorani

Afghanistan has been plagued by large-scale, open looting of mineral resources, involving significant mining operations, bulk transport of minerals along main roads, and crossing the border at just a few, government-controlled points. This mineral looting, amounting to hundreds of millions of dollars per year, involves widespread corruption, entrenches warlords and their networks, and fuels both local conflicts and the wider insurgency in Afghanistan. The government needs to begin to get a better handle on resource exploitation and to collect more substantial royalties and taxes from ongoing mining activities.

Economics & Environment

Technocratic Reforms in Afghanistan: Benefits and Limitations

Technocratic Reforms in Afghanistan: Benefits and Limitations

Tuesday, July 5, 2016

By: William Byrd

Afghanistan’s “technocratic” reforms have resulted in impressive progress in areas such as public financial management. However, these reforms alone will not solve the country’s pressing security, political, and economic problems. This brief outlines the benefits and limitations of technocratic reforms and emphasizes that government and international attention should not be diverted from concrete, short-term measures to improve government functioning, strengthen security, and stimulate a mode...

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance

What Can Be Done to Revive Afghanistan’s Economy?

What Can Be Done to Revive Afghanistan’s Economy?

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

By: William Byrd

Reviving the Afghan economy during a time of intensifying violent conflict, declining external financial aid, and ongoing political uncertainty and dysfunction will be extremely challenging. But the country cannot wait for these entrenched problems to be addressed. While keeping expectations modest, this report proposes some targeted, near-term measures to increase confidence and stimulate the economy. Rather than engaging in politics as usual and following conventional policy prescriptions t...

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance; Global Policy

Reviving Afghanistan's Economy

Reviving Afghanistan's Economy

Thursday, October 22, 2015

By: William Byrd

Some say reviving the Afghan economy in a time of intensifying violent conflict and declining external financial inflows will be impossible. Expectations need to be kept modest, and measures must go beyond conventional economic approaches in order to be effective. This brief puts forward some outside-the-box ideas, which, combined with greater government effectiveness and, hopefully, reductions in violent conflict, may help turn the economy around.

Economics & Environment

Urgent Imperative: Get Afghanistan’s Government Working

Urgent Imperative: Get Afghanistan’s Government Working

Thursday, December 10, 2015

By: James Rupert

Ten weeks after the Taliban briefly captured Kunduz, Afghanistan’s fifth-largest city, neither the fractured government nor the country’s political class is showing signs of heeding that wake-up call—or the other flashing warnings that the 14-month-old government is close to failure. While the United States quickly announced the reversal of its planned withdrawal of forces from the country, the factions in Kabul must figure out how to cooperate in governing, and Washington must do all it can to advance that, analysts say.

Violent Extremism; Democracy & Governance

In Afghanistan, an End to Optimism?

In Afghanistan, an End to Optimism?

Friday, November 20, 2015

By: Gopal Ratnam

Fifty-seven percent of Afghans say their country is heading in the wrong direction, the most pessimistic view recorded in 10 years of the Asia Foundation’s annual survey of Afghans’ attitudes. Unemployment and insecurity are the main causes for a sharp fall this year in public optimism, said Asia Foundation specialists, who discussed the survey results November 19 at USIP.

Economics & Environment; Democracy & Governance