Colombia War-Crime Prisoners Face Past, Plan Future

Colombia War-Crime Prisoners Face Past, Plan Future

Tuesday, December 26, 2017

By: Aubrey Cox; Maria Antonia Montes

The prisoners would be arriving soon and Adriana Combita, like a young teacher preparing to greet a new class, was nervous. This was not the first time that Combita, 26, had led a peacebuilding training with soldiers convicted of war-related crimes. But these were senior officers, commanders with master’s degrees, military officials who had lived abroad.

Education & Training; Human Rights

Group Cohesion and Peace Processes

Group Cohesion and Peace Processes

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

By: Cale Salih; Stephen Gray

Drawing on a wide range of cases, including Burma, Colombia, Senegal, and Uganda, this Peace Brief discusses the internal cohesion of nonstate armed groups, explains how weak cohesion can undermine a peace process, and offers various strategies that those supporting peace processes can deploy to mitigate such risks.

Peace Processes

Inclusive Peace Processes Are Key to Ending Violent Conflict

Inclusive Peace Processes Are Key to Ending Violent Conflict

Friday, May 5, 2017

By: Colette Rausch; Tina Luu

Violent conflict, refugee flows, and internal displacements present international policymakers and practitioners today with unprecedented challenges. Tackling these problems requires not only signed peace agreements but also sustainable peace. It is not enough to bring armed actors to the negotiating table, however. To be effective, the peace process needs to be inclusive and participatory. But what constitutes inclusive participation, and how can peacemakers and peacebuilders achieve it in their own, very different societies? Drawing on discussions in a public forum held in early 2017, this Peace Brief looks at the elements of peacebuilding and explains how critical inclusive participation is to that process.

Peace Processes

The Current Situation in Colombia

The Current Situation in Colombia

Wednesday, February 1, 2017

The 2016 Colombian peace accord that ended one of the world’s longest-running armed conflicts is now being carried out, and the country faces the massive task of reintegrating former fighters and fostering reconciliation. The half-century war killed at least 220,000 people, uprooted more than 6 million, and left some 8 million registered victims. The U.S. invested about $10 billion in strengthening Colombia to fight the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP) and suppress drug trafficking, and actively supported the peace process.

U.S. National Security Chiefs Talk Leadership, Partners

U.S. National Security Chiefs Talk Leadership, Partners

Wednesday, January 11, 2017

By: USIP Staff

The national security advisors to President Barack Obama and President-elect Donald Trump stood shoulder-to-shoulder on a stage at the U.S. Institute of Peace yesterday and shook hands to a standing ovation at a two-day conference on foreign and national security policy. In speeches, National Security Advisor Susan Rice and her designated successor, retired U.S. Army Lieutenant General Michael Flynn, struck a tone of cooperation on the transition between administrations.

Global Policy

Gender and the Role of Women in Colombia's Peace Process

Gender and the Role of Women in Colombia's Peace Process

Thursday, November 3, 2016

The promises and visions articulated in United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325 and subsequent UN resolutions and position papers that recognize the connection between gender equity and women’s participation in all aspects of peace processes and peacebuilding on the one hand, and international peace and security on the other, have not been fulfilled. Nonetheless, these resolutions have opened the way for advocacy that has had some successes in specific contexts. Colombia offers one su...

Gender; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

Q&A: Colombians Narrowly Reject Peace Deal

Q&A: Colombians Narrowly Reject Peace Deal

Monday, October 3, 2016

By: USIP Staff

Colombian voters yesterday defied projections by pollsters and rejected a peace accord that their government had negotiated during four years of talks with the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC-EP). The agreement was intended to end more than a half century of violent conflict that has left well over 220,000 dead and close to 8 million victims, including more than 6 million people forcibly displaced. USIP’s Senior Advisor for Peace Processes Virginia M. Bouvier explains why voters ...

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes; Democracy & Governance

Colombia’s Peace Accord on the Missing (Spanish)

Colombia’s Peace Accord on the Missing (Spanish)

Friday, September 23, 2016

By: Lisa Haugaard

Las desapariciones forzadas son un legado de medio siglo de conflicto armado interno en Colombia.  Afectan a sectores pobres en el campo y en los centros urbanos, trabajadores, campesinos y campesinas, periodistas, defensores y defensoras de los derechos humanos, políticos de la oposición y lideres y lideresas afro-colombianos e indígenas.  Además, miembros de las fuerzas públicas y de la guerrilla han desaparecido en el contexto del conflicto armado colombiano.  Este informe analiza un acuer...

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes