Praise for Peace Economics

 

“The effect of violence on economic progress is very strong, yet it has not received appropriate attention. Jurgen Brauer and J. Paul Dunne have performed a great service by combining general economic perspectives with case studies to survey economic growth in its broadest aspects, in particular stressing the role of internal and external conflict.”

—Kenneth J. Arrow, Nobel Laureate and Joan Kenney Professor of Economics and professor of operations research, Stanford University


 

“Peace Economics is essential reading for any person interested in understanding and assessing the costs of war and how to create real incentives to secure a stable peace. It illuminates the political economy of war and peace brilliantly. The twelve design principles for building peaceful institutions and the four policy lessons brilliantly provide policymakers and concerned citizens with economic and social tools to rebuild trust, social capital, and cooperative harmonious social and political relationships. I heartily commend this book to anyone interested in ensuring that the twenty-first century is an age of maturity and peacefulness.”

—Kevin P. Clements, foundation chair and director, National Centre for Peace and Conflict Studies, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand and past secretary general, International Peace Research Association (IPRA)


 

“The volume entitled Peace Economics: A Macroeconomic Primer for Violence-Afflicted States will be the bible for all peace economists. Jurgen Brauer and J. Paul Dunne, two of the most distinguished peace economists, have produced a timely, nuanced, and excellent book that painstakingly collects the artifacts of modern macroeconomics with relevant social and cultural ammunitions needed for developing the analytical foundation of peace economics. This volume will be an important and decisive step toward dismantling the sophistry of peace economics built solely on economic principles.”

—Partha Gangopadhyay, editor-in-chief, International Journal of Development and Conflict, and associate professor, School of Economics and Finance, University of Western Sydney


 

“Most economics is peace economics in that it assumes away violence, but violence is endemic and economic processes do influence the incentive to use violence. This book takes the violence seriously and examines how macroeconomic policy can contribute to keeping or restoring the peace. It presents the basic economic principles in a way that is relevant to practitioners facing the challenge of reducing violence or trying to promote postconflict reconstruction. The key policy lessons and tips are summarized at each stage and the final chapter looks at how to design and promote peace. Brauer and Dunne very effectively condense a large amount of technical material into a form that policymakers in states afflicted by violence will find very useful.”

—Ron Smith, professor of applied economics, Birkbeck College, University of London


 

“Why should economists care about conflict and violence? Brauer and Dunne have a very convincing answer: Not only has conflict economic costs and causes that hinder long-run development, but conflict is also part of the very nature of economics. Predation and plunder, as well as production and exchange, are means of resource allocation. This book is a mandatory reference for both academics and practitioners interested in the macroeconomics of conflict-affected states, and in how to make peace enduring and resilient.”

—Juan Vargas, professor of economics, Universidad del Rosario

Latest Publications

The 1963 Franco-German Reconciliation Treaty: A Guide for Japan and South Korea?

The 1963 Franco-German Reconciliation Treaty: A Guide for Japan and South Korea?

Friday, September 23, 2022

By: Lily Gardner Feldman

Relations between Japan and South Korea are at a dead end. Officials on both sides have acknowledged the need to improve relations. Beset by stark differences over compensation for historical issues of coerced sexual slaves (so-called comfort women) and forced labor, and contemporary issues of trade, the relationship needs a game changer to alter course. South Korean President Yoon Suk-yeol has called for a “rethink” of the relationship. Conflict-resolution practices beyond East Asia could help us to think outside the box.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Reconciliation

How Climate Change Fuels Instability in Central Africa

How Climate Change Fuels Instability in Central Africa

Thursday, September 22, 2022

By: Archibald Henry

Beleaguered by a history of prolonged conflict and socioeconomic insecurity, Central Africa is now considered one of the most vulnerable regions in the world when it comes to climate and environmental shocks. Countries in the region are already feeling the effects, as unpredictable bouts of extreme weather and drought have started to drive displacement, impede governance and incite tensions at all levels of society.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Environment

Modi, Putin and Xi Join the SCO Summit Amid Turbulent Times

Modi, Putin and Xi Join the SCO Summit Amid Turbulent Times

Thursday, September 22, 2022

By: Cordelia Buchanan Ponczek;  Mary Glantz, Ph.D.;  Carla Freeman, Ph.D.;  Vikram J. Singh

The Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) resumed in-person summits last week in the wake of the COVID pandemic and at a moment of unprecedent change and challenge. Member states Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan are at war over their border. So are dialogue partner states Armenia and Azerbaijan. All SCO members are dealing with the economic impact of the Russian war in Ukraine as well as climate disruptions like the floods overwhelming Pakistan. Mistrust between India and Pakistan, full members since 2017, make cooperation difficult on the SCO’s original core mission of counterterrorism. And India and China, which were building toward the “Wuhan spirit” of cooperation when India joined in 2017, are hardly on speaking terms despite recent progress toward deescalating a friction point along their disputed Line of Actual Control.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Could Climate Change Compel North Korea to Cooperate?

Could Climate Change Compel North Korea to Cooperate?

Thursday, September 22, 2022

By: Frank Aum;  Lucy Stevenson-Yang

Like much of the rest of the world, North Korea is experiencing more frequent and more intense climate-related disasters. In the last few years, it has seen its longest drought and longest rain season in over a century. In 2021, the country’s reclusive dictator, Kim Jong Un, called for immediate steps to mitigate the dramatic impacts of climate change, which compound other challenges facing the country, like food insecurity. While North Korea is not exactly known for its efforts to cooperate with the international community, the severe threats posed by climate change could lead to broader engagement that serves Pyongyang’s interests, as well as the interests of the United States, South Korea and China, who all want peace and stability on the Korean Peninsula.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Environment

Regime Preservation is Putin’s Primary Concern

Regime Preservation is Putin’s Primary Concern

Thursday, September 22, 2022

By: Mary Glantz, Ph.D.

Russian President Vladimir Putin and the Russian leadership are not irrational. Their primary goal is regime survival. To date, the Russian military’s poor performance in Ukraine does not present an existential threat to the Putin regime. Neither the Russian military’s failure to decisively defeat the Ukrainian military nor a Ukrainian victory that leads to complete expulsion of Russian forces from Ukrainian territory are likely to topple it.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

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