“This book is an original and unique contribution to the literature on infectious disease detection and response, offering an encyclopedic consideration of regional health diplomacy as a ‘bridge to peace.’ The volume presents a very detailed case study of three transnational regional disease surveillance programs of varying effectiveness and tackles the question of the legitimacy and accountability of the transnational public-private partnerships which play an increasingly central role in global health assistance.”
—Julie Fischer, Stimson Center

“Disease threatens economic and social stability, increasing despair and the potential for violence in any country. Yet, I’ve seen firsthand how strong national and international partnerships and community-driven health efforts, like the Guinea worm eradication campaign, can be unexpected vehicles for peace in areas of long-standing conflict. Pandemics and Peace outlines what’s possible when we work together for the common good and is a valuable resource for scholars and field implementers.”
—John B. Hardman, MD, president and CEO, The Carter Center

“It is surprising that no one had written this needed book before. But now we have it, and Pandemics and Peace greatly enriches our understanding of how, when, and why medical cooperation occurs even in the face of international conflict.”
—Robert Jervis, Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics, Columbia University

“This excellent book is rich in information and insight, comprehensively conceived, with wise and timely policy suggestions. Long provides a detailed analysis of three regional organizations that cooperatively conduct infectious disease surveillance programs that function among countries with contentious relations in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. This is an admirable work based on solid research and a thorough use of relevant theories.”
—Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies,  
Syracuse University

“This volume provides a very good overview of trends in international health interdependencies and collaboration among a variety of actors to stem harmful impacts. Of particular note is the influence of health interdependencies on security interests and the evolution of the activities of varied actors. There are particularly interesting commentaries on the roles of nonstate actors. These actors include intergovernmental organizations and commercial and humanitarian bodies. The study is quite readable and should be purchased by a wide range of individuals and groups in the health and international relations fields.”
—Mark Zacher, professor emeritus of political science and former director of the Institute of International Relations at University of British Columbia


 

Latest Publications

Megan Chabalowski on USIP’s Peace Teachers Program

Megan Chabalowski on USIP’s Peace Teachers Program

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

By: Megan Chabalowski

Young people are hungry for examples of people working for peace in some of the world’s most violent conflicts, and they are curious about ways they too can make a positive difference. Megan Chabalowski explains how USIP’s Peace Teachers Program provides educators with the in-depth training and resources needed to incorporate peacebuilding into their classrooms and communities.

Education & Training

How Women Are Using Technology to Advance Gender Equality and Peace

How Women Are Using Technology to Advance Gender Equality and Peace

Monday, July 15, 2019

By: Danielle Robertson; Mena Ayazi

From Afghanistan to Sudan, women in conflict areas are increasingly turning to technology to build peace and reduce gender inequality. Just as smart phones and mobile internet facilitate key functions of daily life, they also bring the world women’s voices once confined to the home or marketplace. It is a development with tremendous promise that the international community needs to support by widening access to technology, reducing social barriers to it and providing training that boosts proficiency.

Gender

Scott Smith on the Afghan Peace Process

Scott Smith on the Afghan Peace Process

Thursday, July 11, 2019

By: Scott Smith

Following unprecedented talks between Taliban and Afghan leaders this week, which have provided renewed hope for peace, the Taliban claimed credit for an attack in Ghanzi province. Scott Smith says Afghanistan is now exhibiting “one of the usual paradoxes of this stage of a peace process … where both parties, as they begin to talk more, they begin to fight more.”

A Foot Forward for Peace in Afghanistan?

A Foot Forward for Peace in Afghanistan?

Thursday, July 11, 2019

By: Scott Smith

Taliban and Afghan representatives agreed early this week to a basic, albeit non-binding, roadmap for intra-Afghan negotiations aimed at ending the 18-year war. Since the U.S. resumed direct talks with the Taliban last September, the two sides have focused on the withdrawal of foreign forces and the steps the Taliban will take against terrorists on Afghan soil. Meanwhile, intra-Afghan talks on a political roadmap have yet to get off the ground. After months of seeming stasis, this week’s Doha meeting has injected renewed hope. USIP’s Scott Smith looks at what happened this week, what it means for Afghan women, and the next steps in the peace process.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

Kathleen Kuehnast on Women in Conflict Zones

Kathleen Kuehnast on Women in Conflict Zones

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

At a recent USIP event, Nobel laureate Nadia Murad discussed her efforts to end sexual violence and human trafficking—two criminal practices that Kathleen Kuehnast says “have been institutionalized and militarized.” To disincentivize these human rights abuses, Kuehnast says we must reinforce that these heinous but often lucrative practices are “not a livelihood—this is criminality.”

Gender; Human Rights

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