“This book is an original and unique contribution to the literature on infectious disease detection and response, offering an encyclopedic consideration of regional health diplomacy as a ‘bridge to peace.’ The volume presents a very detailed case study of three transnational regional disease surveillance programs of varying effectiveness and tackles the question of the legitimacy and accountability of the transnational public-private partnerships which play an increasingly central role in global health assistance.”
—Julie Fischer, Stimson Center

“Disease threatens economic and social stability, increasing despair and the potential for violence in any country. Yet, I’ve seen firsthand how strong national and international partnerships and community-driven health efforts, like the Guinea worm eradication campaign, can be unexpected vehicles for peace in areas of long-standing conflict. Pandemics and Peace outlines what’s possible when we work together for the common good and is a valuable resource for scholars and field implementers.”
—John B. Hardman, MD, president and CEO, The Carter Center

“It is surprising that no one had written this needed book before. But now we have it, and Pandemics and Peace greatly enriches our understanding of how, when, and why medical cooperation occurs even in the face of international conflict.”
—Robert Jervis, Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics, Columbia University

“This excellent book is rich in information and insight, comprehensively conceived, with wise and timely policy suggestions. Long provides a detailed analysis of three regional organizations that cooperatively conduct infectious disease surveillance programs that function among countries with contentious relations in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. This is an admirable work based on solid research and a thorough use of relevant theories.”
—Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies,  
Syracuse University

“This volume provides a very good overview of trends in international health interdependencies and collaboration among a variety of actors to stem harmful impacts. Of particular note is the influence of health interdependencies on security interests and the evolution of the activities of varied actors. There are particularly interesting commentaries on the roles of nonstate actors. These actors include intergovernmental organizations and commercial and humanitarian bodies. The study is quite readable and should be purchased by a wide range of individuals and groups in the health and international relations fields.”
—Mark Zacher, professor emeritus of political science and former director of the Institute of International Relations at University of British Columbia


 

Latest Publications

Sameer Lalwani on the Future of U.S.-India Relations

Sameer Lalwani on the Future of U.S.-India Relations

Monday, January 30, 2023

By: Sameer P. Lalwani, Ph.D.

The United States and India have a common cause in their tensions with China, as well as a “natural partnership” on technology investments, says USIP’s Sameer Lalwani. But India remains noncommittal when it comes to Russia’s war on Ukraine: “They’ve concluded that they need Russia to stick around.”

Type: Podcast

Ukraine: A Real Peace Will Require Change from Russia

Ukraine: A Real Peace Will Require Change from Russia

Thursday, January 26, 2023

By: Mary Glantz, Ph.D.

The United States and its allies are seeking ways to promote a sustainable peace in Europe — one that ends Russia’s brutal assault on Ukraine and strengthens a global prohibition on such wars of aggrandizement. Tragically but realistically, Russia, like most historic imperial powers, will need to be defeated militarily before it abandons war as a means to dominate its neighbors. Any negotiated peace before such a defeat will simply let Russia rebuild its forces and renew its assault. Yet even as the West should maintain full support for Ukraine’s defense, such as the tanks much discussed this month, it should encourage negotiation toward specific goals.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

Thomas Hill on the U.N. Mission in Libya

Thomas Hill on the U.N. Mission in Libya

Thursday, January 26, 2023

By: Thomas M. Hill

Twelve years since the fall of Qaddafi, the United Nations' Libya mission carries the same mandate as it did in 2011. With the country still experiencing various degrees of conflict and upheaval, it’s time to “re-envision what we want the U.N. to do” in Libya and create a “mandate [that] will reflect that,” says USIP’s Thomas Hill.

Type: Podcast

Beyond the Courts: History-Related Lawsuits and South Korea-Japan Relations

Beyond the Courts: History-Related Lawsuits and South Korea-Japan Relations

Thursday, January 26, 2023

By: Celeste L. Arrington

While the relationship between South Korea and Japan is fraught with a number of historical and territorial disputes, the current cycle of tensions focuses our attention on lawsuits related to the colonial era. Most notably, bilateral ties soured after 2018, when two landmark rulings from the South Korean Supreme Court ordered Japanese firms to compensate Korean plaintiffs for their wartime forced labor.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Reconciliation

Wrestling with a Humanitarian Dilemma in Afghanistan

Wrestling with a Humanitarian Dilemma in Afghanistan

Wednesday, January 25, 2023

By: William Byrd, Ph.D.

Recent decrees by the Taliban barring Afghan women from attending university or working in NGOs are severely damaging the country both socially and economically, especially coming atop a ban on girls’ secondary education last year. The marginalization of half the population also highlights the “humanitarian dilemma” that aid donors and international agencies face: Afghanistan is highly dependent on humanitarian assistance, not only for saving lives and easing deprivation but also to stabilize its economy. The quandary for international donors is what to do when alleviating suffering benefits the Afghan economy and thereby the Taliban regime, even when that regime is harming its own people?

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Economics

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