“This book is an original and unique contribution to the literature on infectious disease detection and response, offering an encyclopedic consideration of regional health diplomacy as a ‘bridge to peace.’ The volume presents a very detailed case study of three transnational regional disease surveillance programs of varying effectiveness and tackles the question of the legitimacy and accountability of the transnational public-private partnerships which play an increasingly central role in global health assistance.”
—Julie Fischer, Stimson Center

“Disease threatens economic and social stability, increasing despair and the potential for violence in any country. Yet, I’ve seen firsthand how strong national and international partnerships and community-driven health efforts, like the Guinea worm eradication campaign, can be unexpected vehicles for peace in areas of long-standing conflict. Pandemics and Peace outlines what’s possible when we work together for the common good and is a valuable resource for scholars and field implementers.”
—John B. Hardman, MD, president and CEO, The Carter Center

“It is surprising that no one had written this needed book before. But now we have it, and Pandemics and Peace greatly enriches our understanding of how, when, and why medical cooperation occurs even in the face of international conflict.”
—Robert Jervis, Adlai E. Stevenson Professor of International Politics, Columbia University

“This excellent book is rich in information and insight, comprehensively conceived, with wise and timely policy suggestions. Long provides a detailed analysis of three regional organizations that cooperatively conduct infectious disease surveillance programs that function among countries with contentious relations in the Middle East, Southeast Asia, and East Africa. This is an admirable work based on solid research and a thorough use of relevant theories.”
—Louis Kriesberg, Maxwell Professor Emeritus of Social Conflict Studies,  
Syracuse University

“This volume provides a very good overview of trends in international health interdependencies and collaboration among a variety of actors to stem harmful impacts. Of particular note is the influence of health interdependencies on security interests and the evolution of the activities of varied actors. There are particularly interesting commentaries on the roles of nonstate actors. These actors include intergovernmental organizations and commercial and humanitarian bodies. The study is quite readable and should be purchased by a wide range of individuals and groups in the health and international relations fields.”
—Mark Zacher, professor emeritus of political science and former director of the Institute of International Relations at University of British Columbia


 

Latest Publications

As Fragile Kashmir Cease-Fire Turns Three, Here’s How to Keep it Alive

As Fragile Kashmir Cease-Fire Turns Three, Here’s How to Keep it Alive

Wednesday, February 21, 2024

By: Christopher Clary

At midnight on the night of February 24-25, 2021, India and Pakistan reinstated a cease-fire that covered their security forces operating “along the Line of Control (LOC) and all other sectors” in Kashmir, the disputed territory that has been at the center of the India-Pakistan conflict since 1947. While the third anniversary of that agreement is a notable landmark in the history of India-Pakistan cease-fires, the 2021 cease-fire is fragile and needs bolstering to be maintained.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

In Search of a Formula for Lasting Peace in Ukraine

In Search of a Formula for Lasting Peace in Ukraine

Wednesday, February 21, 2024

By: Katie Ruppert;  José Pascal da Rocha

As the war in Ukraine grinds to a stalemate, it is critical to begin building the peace and security frameworks that will establish a just and lasting peace for Ukraine and deter future Russian aggression. This includes building institutions that provide security guarantees for Kyiv.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

Why Calls for Regime Change in North Korea Can Be Counterproductive

Why Calls for Regime Change in North Korea Can Be Counterproductive

Tuesday, February 20, 2024

By: Lauren Sukin

Last September, North Korea’s supreme leader, Kim Jong Un, traveled through Russia’s Far East, where he met with Russian President Vladimir Putin to discuss munition sales in return for collaboration on space and other military technology. While Kim was outside of North Korea, Pyongyang test launched a ballistic missile in a move that is becoming quotidian. Although the test was one of dozens that have happened just in the past year, it was the first such test to occur while North Korea’s supreme leader was out of the country.

Type: Analysis

Global Policy

Report of the Expert Study Group on NATO and Indo-Pacific Partners

Report of the Expert Study Group on NATO and Indo-Pacific Partners

Monday, February 19, 2024

The North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) and its four partner countries in the Indo-Pacific—Australia, Japan, the Republic of Korea (ROK), and New Zealand—have entered a period of increased engagement. This engagement is taking shape in the context of the war waged by the Russian Federation (Russia) against Ukraine, NATO’s growing awareness of the security challenges posed by the People’s Republic of China (China), and important structural changes in the international system, including the return of strategic competition between the United States and China and Russia. It is occurring not only in bilateral NATO-partner relations but also between NATO and these Indo-Pacific countries as a group.

Type: Report

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