“This book effectively analyses the characteristics and effects of building anticorruption provisions into negotiated settlements in post civil war situations.”
Jens Andvig, Research Professor, Department of International Economics, Norwegian Institute of International Affairs

“The enduring prevalence of corruption in conflict-affected countries is frequently bemoaned, but rarely addressed in ways that lead to its reduction. Bert Spector’s Negotiating Peace and Confronting Corruption fills this gap with a cogent analysis that connects symptoms to causes of corruption, and recommends paying attention to corruption as an integral component of negotiating peace and mitigating conflict.  Through a comparative analysis of six cases, the author illustrates lessons learned related to reducing corruption and improving governance, and provides practical advice on how to incorporate anticorruption measures into peace accords and improve the prospects for successful implementation.”
Derick W. Brinkerhoff, Distinguished Fellow in International Public Management, RTI International

“Most contemporary anticorruption strategies employ the language and symbolism of struggle, and emphasize law enforcement and punishment. Yet many of the worst corruption problems arise in postconflict societies, where institutions are weak and trust is fragile—at best. In those settings confrontational reforms are unlikely to be credible, and may well make matters worse for citizens who have suffered much already. In this book, Bertram Spector lays out constructive and useful anticorruption alternatives based on careful analyses of tough cases. Negotiation can build trust and encourage the development of incentives and consensual standards that can not only check the abuse of power but also contribute to peacebuilding and reconstruction. Reformers in many places will look at their challenges differently, and in more constructive ways, once they have considered the lessons Spector develops in these pages.”
Michael Johnston, Colgate University

“This volume is a very important piece of work that demonstrates that anticorruption measures need to be introduced early enough alongside other provisions for good governance to achieve results.”
Diana Klein, International Alert

“Bert Spector has written an extremely useful study, conceptually focused and framed in its analysis, and most pertinent for bringing conflicted states back into responsible governance. His cases studies are concise and comprehensive and his conclusions are sharp and insightful for practitioners and analysts. A most excellent and unusual treatment of corruption and, better yet, how to handle it.”
I. William Zartman, Jacob Blaustein Professor Emeritus of International Organization and Conflict Resolution, Johns Hopkins

 

Latest Publications

Megan Chabalowski on USIP’s Peace Teachers Program

Megan Chabalowski on USIP’s Peace Teachers Program

Wednesday, July 17, 2019

By: Megan Chabalowski

Young people are hungry for examples of people working for peace in some of the world’s most violent conflicts, and they are curious about ways they too can make a positive difference. Megan Chabalowski explains how USIP’s Peace Teachers Program provides educators with the in-depth training and resources needed to incorporate peacebuilding into their classrooms and communities.

Education & Training

How Women Are Using Technology to Advance Gender Equality and Peace

How Women Are Using Technology to Advance Gender Equality and Peace

Monday, July 15, 2019

By: Danielle Robertson; Mena Ayazi

From Afghanistan to Sudan, women in conflict areas are increasingly turning to technology to build peace and reduce gender inequality. Just as smart phones and mobile internet facilitate key functions of daily life, they also bring the world women’s voices once confined to the home or marketplace. It is a development with tremendous promise that the international community needs to support by widening access to technology, reducing social barriers to it and providing training that boosts proficiency.

Gender

Scott Smith on the Afghan Peace Process

Scott Smith on the Afghan Peace Process

Thursday, July 11, 2019

By: Scott Smith

Following unprecedented talks between Taliban and Afghan leaders this week, which have provided renewed hope for peace, the Taliban claimed credit for an attack in Ghanzi province. Scott Smith says Afghanistan is now exhibiting “one of the usual paradoxes of this stage of a peace process … where both parties, as they begin to talk more, they begin to fight more.”

A Foot Forward for Peace in Afghanistan?

A Foot Forward for Peace in Afghanistan?

Thursday, July 11, 2019

By: Scott Smith

Taliban and Afghan representatives agreed early this week to a basic, albeit non-binding, roadmap for intra-Afghan negotiations aimed at ending the 18-year war. Since the U.S. resumed direct talks with the Taliban last September, the two sides have focused on the withdrawal of foreign forces and the steps the Taliban will take against terrorists on Afghan soil. Meanwhile, intra-Afghan talks on a political roadmap have yet to get off the ground. After months of seeming stasis, this week’s Doha meeting has injected renewed hope. USIP’s Scott Smith looks at what happened this week, what it means for Afghan women, and the next steps in the peace process.

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes

Kathleen Kuehnast on Women in Conflict Zones

Kathleen Kuehnast on Women in Conflict Zones

Tuesday, July 9, 2019

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.

At a recent USIP event, Nobel laureate Nadia Murad discussed her efforts to end sexual violence and human trafficking—two criminal practices that Kathleen Kuehnast says “have been institutionalized and militarized.” To disincentivize these human rights abuses, Kuehnast says we must reinforce that these heinous but often lucrative practices are “not a livelihood—this is criminality.”

Gender; Human Rights

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