“This volume is a model of lucidity and clarity and a joy to read. Although the particular case study is well known, Smith brings many new insights through an extensive trawl of the archives in London, Dublin, and Belfast, and in his use of private interviews.”
Paul Arthur, University of Ulster

“This is an excellent study of a crucial period of British policy towards Northern Ireland. The author has done a very good job in searching the archives and producing a clear and coherent narrative in a detail that has not been matched before. This book is a useful addition to the literature on the Northern Ireland conflict because it is informed by a close understanding of the historical evidence and an acute knowledge of how the British and Irish political systems work.”
Paul Dixon, Kingston University

“A highly intelligent, systematic, and original argument about a vitally important subject.”
Richard English, University of St. Andrews

“Bill Smith provides us with a unique insight into the use of policy responses by states in managing and resolving violent political conflicts while placing his sharp lens on the unintended consequences of these policy responses. In using a range of case studies from Northern Ireland, dealing with policing, justice, and governance, the author shows how policymakers need to focus on ‘the context’ for their decisions and be more aware of the choices they make. There are tools here which will help ‘peace technicians’ heighten their awareness of the policymaking context. You will find solid evidence of what works and what does not in the policymakers’ world when dealing with violent political conflict.”
Monica McWilliams, Northern Ireland Human Rights Commission

“This is an intelligent and impressive book, with a wealth of detail. Applying useful models from political science, Smith’s book is clear and cogent––a very accurate monograph which adds to our knowledge of the formative years of the Northern Ireland conflict. The book is admirably objective and few policy actors are spared criticism.”
Jon Tonge, University of Liverpool

 

Latest Publications

 Amb. Bill Taylor on Russia’s Annexation of Crimea

Amb. Bill Taylor on Russia’s Annexation of Crimea

Thursday, March 21, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

On the five-year anniversary of Russia’s annexation of Crimea, Amb. Taylor—a former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine—explains why it has been so difficult for Ukraine and its allies to oust Russia from the Ukrainian territory. “Sadly … the people of Crimea are worse off than they were five years ago,” while the West continues to struggle with how to respond to Moscow’s territorial grab.

Conflict Analysis & Prevention

The Fatemiyoun Army: Reintegration into Afghan Society

The Fatemiyoun Army: Reintegration into Afghan Society

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

By: Ahmad Shuja Jamal

Since 2013, as many as 50,000 Afghans have fought in Syria as part of the Fatemiyoun, a pro-Assad force organized by the Iranian Revolutionary Guards Corps. Based on field interviews with former fighters and their families, this Special Report examines the motivations of members of the Afghan Shia Hazara communities who joined the Fatemiyoun as well as the economic and political challenges of reintegrating them into Afghan society.

Civilian-Military Relations; Fragility & Resilience

Violent Extremism and Community Policing in Tanzania

Violent Extremism and Community Policing in Tanzania

Tuesday, March 19, 2019

By: Lillian Dang

After the 1998 bombing of the U.S. embassies in Dar es Salaam and Nairobi and the increasing presence of al-Shabaab in nearby countries, Tanzania turned to community policing as a way of responding to the threat of violent extremism. But is it having the desired outcome? This new report, based on workshops and interviews with police, community leaders, and others, examines the challenges and potential of community policing in addressing Tanzania’s public safety and security concerns.

Violent Extremism

Patricia Kim on North Korea Diplomacy

Patricia Kim on North Korea Diplomacy

Thursday, March 14, 2019

By: Patricia M. Kim

Patricia Kim analyzes the failure of the Hanoi Summit. “China should lean in,” says Kim discussing the spectrum of tools Beijing has available from diplomacy to unilateral sanctions. In future negotiations, the U.S. should focus on “hammering out a clearly defined and time bound roadmap that ends with the de-nuclearization of North Korea.”

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

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