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Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki spoke on July 23, 2009 at an exclusive public engagement at USIP and answered questions from our audience.

Iraqi Prime Minister Will Keep Door Open for U.S. Military Role After 2011

Speaking at an exclusive event at the U.S. Institute of Peace on July 23, 2009, Iraqi Prime Minister Nuri Al-Maliki kept the door open for continuing the U.S. military presence in his country beyond 2011, when the current Status of Forces Agreement expires.
 
“If Iraqi forces need more training and support, we will reexamine the agreement at that time, based on our own national needs,” the prime minister said through a translator, as he addressed nearly 100 audience members at USIP headquarters in Washington, D.C.
 

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