South Sudan gained independence on July 9, 2011. USIP monitored the developments preceding and following this dramatic event.

20160328-South-Sudan-Referendum-Ballot.jpg

In January 2011, southern Sudan voted for independence through a referendum. Although Sudanese President Omar Bashir acknowledged this result, the road to independence remained plagued by unresolved issues of sharing oil revenues, defining disputed borders, and deliberating citizenship laws. Moreover, southern Sudan continued to suffer from challenges of severe underdevelopment, poor governance, and persistent ethnic divisions. Nonetheless, South Sudan gained independence on July 9, 2011.

On the Issues

  • Sudan at Risk | May 23, 2011:  USIP experts discuss the recent hostilities in Abyei and why it threatens the stability of the soon-to-be Republic of South Sudan and the overall region.
  • Peace in Sudan | June 13, 2011:  USIP experts discuss the recent troubling developments in Sudan and why there are renewed concerns about prospects for peace in Sudan.
  • South Sudan Independence | July 1, 2011: USIP expert Jon Temin provides a preview of South Sudan's upcoming independence.
  • Despite Violence, South Sudan Preparing for Independence | July 1, 2011: Deadly attacks in two of the ethnically mixed regions along the tense north-south border are testing the durability of the Sudanese peace process.
  • Just Days from Independence, South Sudan Approves Transitional Constitution | July 7, 2011:  On July 6, the legislative assembly approved the transition constitution that political leaders and legal specialists include USIP experts have been working on for months.
  • South Sudan's Independence | July 11, 2011:  After witnessing the independence celebrations, USIP Jennings Randolph Senior Fellow describes what secession means for the future of the two Sudans.

Events and Multimedia on Independence

Latest Publications

Zambia’s New Leadership and the Stakes for Africa

Friday, September 24, 2021

By: USIP Staff

Weeks after his election to lead his southern African nation, Zambian President Hakainde Hichilema vowed to reverse his country’s recent erosion of democracy and good governance, and to stabilize an economy in recession—all despite the burdens of COVID, environmental shocks, and a dangerous “mountain” of debt accumulated in recent years.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Democracy & Governance

Prioritize Building Resilience at this Year’s U.N. General Assembly

Prioritize Building Resilience at this Year’s U.N. General Assembly

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

By: Corinne Graff, Ph.D.

World leaders are gathering in New York this week for the 2021 U.N. General Assembly against a backdrop of unprecedented global crises, including the continued spread of COVID-19 due to lack of access to vaccines; a growing hunger crisis as more people around the world die every day from starvation than from COVID-19; and the fact that roughly one percent of the world’s entire population — or one in every 97 people — is now forcibly displaced. These humanitarian challenges are compounded by a generational climate crisis and rising tensions with Russia and China that will need to be carefully managed. 

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

China and the U.S. Exit from Afghanistan: Not a Zero-Sum Outcome

China and the U.S. Exit from Afghanistan: Not a Zero-Sum Outcome

Wednesday, September 22, 2021

By: Andrew Scobell, Ph.D.

It has become fashionable to characterize recent events in Afghanistan as a loss for the United States and a win for China. This zero-sum interpretation framed in the narrow context of U.S.-China relations is too simplistic and off the mark. The reality is far more complex and nuanced. The end of the U.S. military presence in Afghanistan and the collapse of that country’s pro-Western government do not automatically translate into significant Chinese gains, nor do they trigger a swift Beijing swoop to fill the vacuum in Kabul left by Washington.

Type: Analysis and Commentary

Global Policy

View All Publications