Peace Terms is an extensive glossary with short definitions of a wide range of complex and often confusing terms used in the field of peacebuilding. Authoritative but accessible, Peace Terms has been used by a wide audience, from peacebuilding practitioners and scholars to students in college courses, from participants in USIP Academy courses and trainings to high school students doing research.

Peace Terms is an invaluable contribution to the literature and is comprehensive and concise. The revised edition does an excellent job of expanding and updating the glossary entries in order to make the publication more comprehensive and to reflect changes in the peacebuilding field since the appearance of the first edition.

Matthew Levinger, Research Professor of International Affairs, George Washington University

To help these readers navigate this cross-disciplinary field, the USIP glossary answers such questions as: What exactly is a “conflict entrepreneur”? What do we mean by “refoulement”? And perhaps most importantly, what is the difference between peacekeeping, peacemaking, and peacebuilding?
 
As with the first edition, the editor has consulted a wide range of online and print sources, as well as the senior staff at USIP, in the process of producing the latest version of the glossary.

  • Contains over 350 short definitions, including over 70 new or revised terms.
  • Covers a wide range of complex and often confusing concepts.
  • Used by practitioners, scholars, and students.

Dan Snodderly is an editor and publishing consultant who served as USIP’s director of publications from 1993 to 2004, and previously worked as an editor and writer at Cornell University Press and Encyclopaedia Britannica.

Words matter. In the art of peacemaking, where failure can be deadly, words matter even more. With lucid, elegant prose, Dan Snodderly’s Peace Terms delivers a powerful antidote for the buzzwords and fuzzy concepts that sometimes confound even the most insightful discourse about peace and conflict. The glossary is also a wonderful resource for newcomers who want to learn core concepts for the first time and for old hands who strive to keep their thinking fresh, simple, and clear.

John T. Crist, Associate Professor of Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University Korea

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