To Advance Peace in Burma, Take One Step Back

To Advance Peace in Burma, Take One Step Back

Thursday, June 22, 2017

By: Kyi Kyi Seinn

At Burma’s latest country-wide peace conference last month, participants made some progress toward broad agreements that can help end the country’s decades of ethnic conflicts. The talks advanced toward ideas for the country’s future in matters such as politics, the economy and principles for environmental policies. But not security.

Peace Processes; Justice, Security & Rule of Law; Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue

Libya’s Civil War: Brewing Terrorism in Europe

Libya’s Civil War: Brewing Terrorism in Europe

Thursday, June 15, 2017

By: Edward Jackson; Maral Noori

When Salman Abedi, a 22-year-old Libyan-British man, detonated a suicide bomb among concert-goers in Manchester last month, his attack was the latest of several linked to the Libyan chapter of the Islamic State. Abedi, born and raised in England, committed the attack days after returning from the last of several visits to Libya.

Violent Extremism; Democracy & Governance; Fragility and Resilience

Next Steps on Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Next Steps on Israeli-Palestinian Peace

Friday, May 26, 2017

By: Keith Mines

At each stop on President Trump’s recent visit to the Middle East—Riyadh, Jerusalem and Bethlehem—he reiterated his seriousness about moving forward on Middle East peace. The theme continued in his visit to the Vatican, where the Pope gave the President a small sculpted olive tree and told his guest: “It is my desire that you become an olive tree to construct peace."

Mediation, Negotiation & Dialogue; Peace Processes; Religion

The Risks of China’s $4 Trillion 'Belt-and-Road' Plan

The Risks of China’s $4 Trillion 'Belt-and-Road' Plan

Friday, May 12, 2017

By: Jennifer Staats

Chinese President Xi Jinping is gathering 29 heads of state and officials from more than 110 countries in Beijing starting May 14 for the first summit of his high-stakes Belt and Road Initiative. The $4 trillion plan offers the promise of economic growth, stability and increased connectivity for countries around the world. But it also faces—and creates—a host of complications for China and the other countries involved.

Economics & Environment

Shock at Pakistan Lynching Opens Way to Curb Extremism

Shock at Pakistan Lynching Opens Way to Curb Extremism

Thursday, May 11, 2017

By: Moeed Yusuf; Lauren McNally

Mashal Khan’s lynching last month for alleged blasphemy by fellow university students in Pakistan’s Khyber Pakhtunkhwa (KP) province sent shockwaves across Pakistani society. It instantly stirred recollections of the 2011 murder of Salman Taseer, a former governor of Pakistan’s Punjab province, by his own security guard because he had opposed laws punishing blasphemy. Both episodes highlighted the deep intolerance for diversity and the readiness to use violence over religious disagreements in Pakistan. But there was one major difference that could open an opportunity to steer Pakistan in a more moderate direction.

Violent Extremism; Democracy & Governance