Afghan women have made real progress—just ask Roya Sadat.

Afghan women have made real progress—just ask Roya Sadat.

Tuesday, April 9, 2019

By: Hodei Sultan; Asma Ebadi

A generation of women have grown up in Afghanistan since the Taliban regime was overthrown in 2001. Whether it’s in education, healthcare, culture or government, women have seen steady progress throughout Afghan society in the last 18 years. And those who have lived through the Taliban’s misogynistic rule, like Roya Sadat—the first Afghan woman film director and producer in the post-Taliban era—fear that all this progress could be discarded in a peace deal with the Taliban.

Gender; Peace Processes

Ukraine’s Presidential Vote: Free but Not Yet Fair

Ukraine’s Presidential Vote: Free but Not Yet Fair

Friday, April 5, 2019

By: William B. Taylor

Following Ukraine’s first round of presidential voting on Sunday, the country faces a tough, maybe nasty, two-week campaign for the runoff. This second election since the 2014 pro-democracy movement that Ukrainians call their “Revolution of Dignity” reflects significant consolidation of Ukraine’s democracy in the intervening five years. That is no small achievement, given Russia’s continuing interference—especially the war in Ukraine’s Donbas region, which has killed more than 13,000 people in those five years.

Democracy & Governance; Electoral Violence

Protecting Elections from Cyberattacks

Protecting Elections from Cyberattacks

Monday, April 1, 2019

By: Jonas Claes; Jack Stuart

With elections increasingly dependent on modern technology, cybersecurity has become a vital shield against election violence and manipulation. Cyberattacks present a growing threat to both nascent and mature democracies, as they can shape the election process, erode citizen trust and trigger other forms of election violence. The 2019 elections in Indonesia and Ukraine illustrate the threat cyberattacks pose, even in relatively consolidated and stable democracies.

Electoral Violence

Taking Practical Ideas on Peace and Conflict to U.S. High Schools

Taking Practical Ideas on Peace and Conflict to U.S. High Schools

Wednesday, March 27, 2019

By: Allison Sturma

At West Central High School in Hartford, South Dakota, the students in JoAnne Bohl’s history classes have learned about—and lived in—a world defined by war and violent conflict. Bohl, a part of USIP’s Peace Teacher program, wants students to think about conflict in new ways, and to cultivate their own potential to contribute to positive change around the world.

Education & Training; Youth

Building a Legacy of Peace with the Dalai Lama

Building a Legacy of Peace with the Dalai Lama

Thursday, March 21, 2019

By: USIP Staff

In October 2018, USIP and the Dalai Lama hosted their third annual dialogue with youth peacebuilders from countries across Africa, Asia, Latin America and the Middle East. Many of these countries face the world’s deadliest wars, as well as campaigns by extremist groups to incite youth to violence. In the face of these challenges, these youth leaders are among their countries’ most effective peacebuilders. The dialogues with the Dalai Lama are aimed at helping these youth leaders to build the practical skills and personal resilience needed to build peace in their own countries.

Nonviolent Action; Youth

As Ukraine Builds a Church Independent of Russia, It Must Prevent Violence

As Ukraine Builds a Church Independent of Russia, It Must Prevent Violence

Monday, March 18, 2019

By: USIP Staff

News from Ukraine is focused on its startling presidential election, in which the leading candidate is a comedian whose political role before now has been to play a fictional president in a TV series. Less visible alongside that drama is the country’s process of consolidating the new independence of its Orthodox church after centuries of control by Moscow. Ukraine’s religious independence from Russia is a high-stakes step, one that the Russian government actively opposes, toward a fully independent Ukraine following 300-plus years of Russian domination. In the struggle over control of the church, news accounts and a new U.N. Human Rights Report suggests that Ukraine is mainly—but perhaps not perfectly—preventing acts of intimidation that could increase the risk of violence.

Religion

Marking Progress on International Women’s Day

Marking Progress on International Women’s Day

Thursday, March 7, 2019

By: Kathleen Kuehnast, Ph.D.; Mena Ayazi

The annual celebration of International Women’s Day engages citizens from all corners of the globe to recognize how far women have come in society—and how much more needs to be done. Next year marks the 20th anniversary of the implementation of U.N. Security Council Resolution (UNSCR) 1325, a time for the international community to analyze the impact of the Women, Peace and Security (WPS) Agenda.

Gender

Bougainville: Is the Delayed Independence Referendum a Next Step Toward Peace?

Bougainville: Is the Delayed Independence Referendum a Next Step Toward Peace?

Tuesday, March 5, 2019

By: Jonas Claes; Jack Stuart

The autonomous region of Bougainville in Papua New Guinea (PNG) is entering a new phase in its quest for peace, almost 20 years after a peace agreement ended a 10-year civil war. Later this year the island will vote in a referendum on greater autonomy or independence from PNG. Unresolved tensions, an unclear referendum timeline, and fears of a return to violence will all impact this tense election process.

Electoral Violence