Attention to racially and ethnically motivated violent extremism (REMVE) and far-right extremism around the globe has increased significantly over the past few years as white supremacist and REMVE-motivated attacks and rhetoric have proliferated. While much of this attention has focused on actors and attacks within North America and Europe, REMVE movements and ideologies are both present and prominent in a variety of contexts around the globe. 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FMdM9ZXfbm4

As a part of RESOLVE’s sixth annual Global Forum Series, USIP held the RESOLVE Network for a virtual conversation about REMVE trends and activities in lesser discussed contexts. Focusing on Australia and India, this conversation brought together leading experts to unpack ongoing trends and their implications for the current landscape of violent extremism and REMVE. The discussion explored manifestations of REMVE movements and ideologies in Australia and India, focusing on their similarities and differences, transnational links, narratives, and overall implications for efforts to address threats posed by their activities.   

Stay tuned for more on the 2021 RESOLVE Global Forum Series by following us on Twitter at @resolvenet and joining the conversation with #RESOLVEForum. Convened virtually, the Global Forum Series brings together leading experts and researchers for thought-provoking fireside conversations on evolving trends and dynamics in the violent extremist landscape. 

Speakers

Alastair Reed, opening remarks
Senior Expert and Executive Director, RESOLVE Network

Amarnath Amarasingam
Assistant Professor, School of Religion, Queen’s University; Member, RESOLVE Research Advisory Council

Julian Droogan 
Senior Lecturer, Department of Security Studies and Criminology, Macquarie University; Editor-in-Chief, Journal of Policing, Intelligence and Counter Terrorism

Lise Waldek
Lecturer, Department of Security Studies and Criminology, Macquarie University; Member, Executive Committee for the Addressing Violent Extremism and Radicalisation to Terrorism Research Network

Cynthia Miller-Idriss, moderator/chair
Professor, American University
Director, Polarization and Extremism Research & Innovation Lab at American University

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