Sierra Leone, Senegal, Malawi and Cape Verde all have made significant progress toward promoting democratic reform. These four countries’ heads of state shared the stage at the United States Institute of Peace for an important conversation on the link between good governance and increasing prosperity in their countries and across Africa.

Read the event coverage, African Leaders Outline Roots of Stability, Economic Growth

Jose Maria Neves, Ernest Bai Koroma, Johnnie Carson, Dr. Joyce Banda, Macky Sall
Jose Maria Neves, Ernest Bai Koroma, Johnnie Carson, Dr. Joyce Banda, Macky Sall

 Among the topics for discussion were promoting democracy, transparency, economic advancement, their countries’ roles as regional leaders, and how partnering with organizations like the Millennium Challenge Corporation has helped motivate and sustain democratic reforms.

Panelists:

  • Ernest Bai Koroma
    President of Sierra Leone
  • Macky Sall
    President of Senegal
  • Joyce Banda
    President of Malawi
  • Jose Maria Neves
    Prime Minister of Cape Verde
  • Jim Marshall 
    Introductions
    President, U.S. Institute of Peace
  • Johnnie Carson
    Moderator
    Assistant Secretary for African Affairs, Department of State

Photos:

Photos are available for use with credit to "U.S. Institute of Peace." To download an image, click "Options," then "Download."

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