Ten Years after 9/11: Evaluating a Decade of Conflicts on the Rules of War

USIP and the American Red Cross hosted a panel of distinguished experts to discuss the findings of a recent American Red Cross survey of America's first post-9/11 generation and relevance and importance of international humanitarian law.


Almost ten years after the devastating attacks of 9/11, the United States engaged in two wars that sent tens of thousands of American troops to fight in Afghanistan and Iraq. A new survey conducted recently by the American Red Cross about the attitudes of the first post-9/11 generation of American youth reveal for the first time their opinions about the rules of war and what is or is not acceptable behavior in wartime.

On June 3, 2011, the United States Institute of Peace (USIP) and the American Red Cross hosted a timely discussion on the relevance and importance of international humanitarian law at a time when civil conflicts are also erupting in North Africa and the Middle East.


Speakers

  • Rosa Brooks, panelist
    Special Coordinator for the Office of Rule of Law and International Humanitarian Policy
    Department of Defense
  • Richard Jackson, panelist
    Special Assistant for Law of War Matters at the U. S. Army
    Office of the Judge Advocate General
    (invited, but unable to attend)
  • William K. Lietzau, panelist
    Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for Detainee Policy
    Department of Defense
  • David Meltzer, panelist
    Senior Vice President
    American Red Cross
  • Matthew Waxman, panelist
    Associate Professor of Law
    Columbia University
  • Colette Rausch, moderator
    Director, Rule of Law Center of Innovation
    United States Institute of Peace
  • Tara Sonenshine, introductory remarks
    Executive Vice President
    United States Institute of Peace
     

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