Events

Upcoming USIP Events

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 - 9:30am

This event has been cancelled. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

Over 15 years, nearly half of all people, 3.34 billion, have suffered from political violence or lived under its shadow, notes a new OECD report. Violence is on the rise and, surprisingly, conflict is not the leading cause of death.  Fragile contexts, especially those where governments are ineffective and social contracts with their populations broken—drive much of this violence, plus refugee flight, pandemic diseases and other catastrophes. So understanding and measuring fragility is vital to U.S. and international policies that aim to prevent crises.  Join the U.S. Institute of Peace and the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development for the Washington launch of an OECD report—States of Fragility 2016—that offers a new approach to monitoring the fragility of states at risk.

Wednesday, January 25, 2017 - 11:00am

Kenya, Liberia, Pakistan and the Democratic Republic of the Congo are scheduled to hold national elections in the next 24 months, and each has suffered various levels of election-related violence in the past. For election officials and civil society working towards peaceful elections in such countries, what are the most proven ways to prevent violence? The U.S. Institute of Peace will hold an online conversation via Twitter to discuss past and upcoming elections at risk of violence. Participants will include the contributing authors of Electing Peace, a recent research volume that examines the effectiveness of common practices to prevent election violence.

Monday, January 30, 2017 - 1:30pm

President-elect Trump’s surprise November phone conversation with Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif underscored Pakistan’s continuing importance to U.S. interests in a stable South Asia. The new U.S. administration can expect to see this vital country hold national elections within 18 months. On January 30, the U.S. Institute of Peace will host a conversation with Bilawal Bhutto Zardari, chairman of the Pakistan Peoples Party, the largest opposition party in parliament. The discussion will address Pakistan’s serious internal security challenges; debate among Pakistani civilian and military leaders over the country’s domestic counterterrorism initiatives; and Pakistan’s broader political and democratic dynamics. As a new U.S. administration and Congress begin work, Mr. Bhutto Zardari also will share his perspective on the two countries’ relationship.

 

Recent Webcasts

U.S. Special Envoy Speaks on Sudan and South Sudan
U.S. Special Envoy Speaks on Sudan and South Sudan

Ambassador Donald Booth is completing almost two and half years as the U.S. special envoy for Sudan and South Sudan. He will discuss the lessons learned from recent international initiatives to end...

For 130 Million People, a Need for Longer-Term Relief
For 130 Million People, a Need for Longer-Term Relief

More than 130 million people worldwide require humanitarian assistance to survive because of crises or disasters, including violent conflict, according to the United Nations. The World Humanitarian...

Myanmar’s Difficult Path Toward Peace
Myanmar’s Difficult Path Toward Peace

International attention toward Myanmar has focused largely on the country's transition from a half-century of military rule toward democratic governance. But ending nearly 70 years of civil conflict...

Cultural Heritage: A Target in War, an Engine of Peace
Cultural Heritage: A Target in War, an Engine of Peace

In 2001, Taliban fighters dynamited Afghanistan’s massive Bamiyan Buddha statues, carved into cliff faces, into rubble. Serb forces burned Bosnia-Herzegovina’s Sarajevo National Library in 1992 and...