Rule of Law is examining the evolving legal and institutional arrangements for addressing violations of international humanitarian law (IHL). As part of this ongoing effort, USIP has just produced a guide to training programs in IHL for military personnel around the world.

The implementation and enforcement of international legal norms concerning the conduct of war and accountability for atrocities committed in the course of conflict remain critical challenges for those engaged in conflict resolution and post-conflict peacebuilding. Both the jurisprudence in this area and institutional arrangements for addressing violations of international criminal law continue to evolve and to require creative analysis and input. USIP seeks to contribute to the continuing development of international law relevant to armed conflict as well as the means for marrying law and practice in zones of conflict.

As part of this effort, the Institute has just published a guide to training in international humanitarian law (the law that governs the conduct of war), which is available for military personnel and civilian leaders of militaries around the world. The guide includes practical information regarding how governments can establish their own international humanitarian law training programs, as well as contact information that will enable officials to gain access to training programs and assistance provided by other states.

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Gender

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